Ever feel like a groveler is too small for 3'-5' surf?

92122

Michael Peterson status
Jul 29, 2015
1,996
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83
I feel like once I get into my summer surfing cadence, 2-3 days a week consistently, I will be able to take my 5' 10" out on head high days and have fun, but not surfing it much for many many months, I feel like even a 3'-4'+ day is moving too fast with solid walls going right under me..??..

I know it's relative to your ability, but I surfed 3 times this week and didn't get many waves on the small board, mostly just paddling around. 42 y/o 190lbs on a 36L 5' 10". ????? Frustrating, but I know I just need to keep at it.
 

JeffRSpicoli

OTF status
Aug 9, 2019
264
247
43
Yes know the feeling, had the CI Average Joe, volumed appropriately for groveling and I hated it. Traded it in for the CI Hoglet of similar dims and loved it!
 
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Reactions: Waterlogged05
May 20, 2020
18
3
3
I guess I'm having the opposite feeling - I want a longer groveler/mini simmons to help get into the small stuff under 3' Everybody tells me to go short but its hard to compete with all the long boards and softies on a 5'10 mini simmons in slow rolling beach break. I feel like a 6'6 would really help me compete. Any one have similar feelings? I transition to a performance board once it gets 3'. but I surf all beach breaks
 
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Sharkbiscuit

Tom Curren status
Aug 6, 2003
13,916
5,008
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Jacksonville Beach
3-5' if the surf is flat faced/weak grovel should do fine, otherwise I'd want something else.

Under 3' with softies and longboards precluding wavecount on a 5'10" Mini Sim is find another spot or find another sport. Starting about 10 years ago I began to sit sessions out in high summer because it's breaking in a 20-yard stretch with 45+ people on it.
 

llilibel03

Rabbitt Bartholomew status
Jul 28, 2005
8,192
2,448
113
"Everybody tells me to go short..."

Don't ride what you "think" you should be riding, and especially don't ride what others think you should be riding. Ride whatever brings you the most stock. If you're not catching waves you're obviously on the wrong board.

Oh wait, what am I saying. :foreheadslap: Everybody should be riding a 24 liter shortboard or a 5'4" mini groveler or you're a kook.
 
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ghost_of_lewis_samuels

Legend (inyourownmind)
Oct 27, 2019
550
312
63
woah. 5'4 and 38 Liters? what shape?
Made a mistake: Here's the dims

Length :5'3
Width: 21.5 / 17.8'' (N 12'') / 17.98'' (T 12'')
Thicc: 2.62''
Nose Rocker 3.34''
Tail Rocker 1.68''
Volume 33.87 cu L

Bottom contours

1/3 : Flat
2/3: double concave
3/3/ Vee / double concave

fins: quad

me: 5'7'' , 156lbs
 
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VaB

Michael Peterson status
Nov 14, 2004
2,819
250
83
Virginia Beach, VA
3-5 is a daily

if u guys are groveling in 5ft faces that explains alot
1-3 and breaking - short will work
1-3 mush you need a longer board ( 6’6” still too small) get a mid or log

In nj 2 foot I could ride a 5’5” fish - in.vb 3 foot I need much more board typically

Id always rather be too warm than too cold and too much board over to little
 

Muscles

Billy Hamilton status
Jun 1, 2013
1,561
1,563
113
California/Hawaii
I guess I'm having the opposite feeling - I want a longer groveler/mini simmons to help get into the small stuff under 3' Everybody tells me to go short but its hard to compete with all the long boards and softies on a 5'10 mini simmons in slow rolling beach break. I feel like a 6'6 would really help me compete. Any one have similar feelings? I transition to a performance board once it gets 3'. but I surf all beach breaks
Similar issue here. Trying to grovel against legit tankers and wavestorms. Good luck trying to get a wave on a small performance groveler.

Go longer.
 

GromsDad

Duke status
Jan 21, 2014
33,445
3,790
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West of the Atlantic. East of the ICW.
What board (model) is it?

Some higher volume boards can inhibit wave catching on some waves when it gets bigger. Sometimes being more on top of the water can hinder your entry.
This ^^^^^^ When you are grovelling your angle of attack on takeoff is relatively flat. You're basically taking off with the nose of the board going towards the beach. As it gets bigger your angle becomes more and more down hill. Volume and width in the front half of the board can become a hinderance as things get steeper. The shape of the rails and any concaves in the front half of the board also have a big effect as well.