Turkey - DONE

grapedrink

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May 21, 2011
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Problem with internal temp "rules" is that it assumes the temp based on the worst case scenario. If you cook it to whatever number is recommended by whoever doesn't want to get sued at one of the coldest corner of the bird, your breast will already be overcooked.

The 165 value cited above is arguably correct from a food safety perspective (pvssies) and an absolute max. I'd shoot for 155, based on a thermometer straight down through the breast. Some of the joints might be a bit under, but you can always throw some pieces back under the broiler if need be. Remember that secondary cooking will raise the bird another 5-10F.
 

TeamScam

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Jan 14, 2002
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That's a good point but I also don't think ones trust is wisely placed with just anyone when it comes to cooking something like a fowl which can make ones butt explode many times over the course of 24 hours, without the painful wretching and other delights.
If I eat chicken often, I can handle slightly undercooked chicken a little better than if I never ever eat chicken. A scientist will likely be along to tell me that's all in my head, but that's my experience, placebo or not.
I'd rather have dry turkey than scary juicy poopy turkey any day.
I'm surprised how willing people are to let fools cook their birds for them. I'm surprised people let fools wash dishes, drive cars, busses, you name it. He'll look at the people who govern us!
Just gimme some turkey IDGAF.
 

grapedrink

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I dunno, I ate painfully overcooked turkey, chicken breast, pork tenderloin etc so many times growing up that I'd almost (key word: almost) rather eat a vegetarian meal than eat something that was killed a 2nd time in the oven. Maybe it was a cultural thing with the era my parents grew up in, since only meat I ate that wasn't overcooked was steak. Overcooked turkey is especially bad.
 

Joshua2415

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Jul 18, 2005
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Pull it out at 161, it will continue to cook, but won't be overdone.

We've been doing the following for years and the bird comes out perfect every time:
- Rub oil on the bird
- Put in 500 degree oven for 30 minutes (makes skin brown & crispy)
- Pull out and put foil 'shield' over the breast & turn oven down to 350 degrees
- Cook until internal temp hits 161 and pull it out
:cheers:
 
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enframed

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Problem with internal temp "rules" is that it assumes the temp based on the worst case scenario. If you cook it to whatever number is recommended by whoever doesn't want to get sued at one of the coldest corner of the bird, your breast will already be overcooked.

The 165 value cited above is arguably correct from a food safety perspective (pvssies) and an absolute max. I'd shoot for 155, based on a thermometer straight down through the breast. Some of the joints might be a bit under, but you can always throw some pieces back under the broiler if need be. Remember that secondary cooking will raise the bird another 5-10F.

Agree. Spatchcock is the best method for equal temps everywhere, I have found. And it cuts cook time in half or so. Did it last year, soooo good, for turkey, which is never a favorite meat anyway.

Edit: the pic is not the turkey I made, but it looked a lot like that.

 
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ElOgro

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145° in the sous vide. Guaranteed it will come out perfect. The back, legs and wings I'll roast in the oven because it's hard to mess those up.
:shaka::shaka: Juicy ftw!

Anyone ever fry ‘em up or is that a southern thing? I had a friend from bumfuck, La. that turned me onto that method. It takes a little gear but the results are worth it.

If I remember right, 3 minutes per pound, smaller birds better, juice up the breasts with a cattle hypo and marinade of your choice. We used peanut oil for cooking.

I was surprised how moist it turned out.
 

sussle

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Oct 11, 2009
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:shaka::shaka: Juicy ftw!

Anyone ever fry ‘em up or is that a southern thing? I had a friend from bumfuck, La. that turned me onto that method. It takes a little gear but the results are worth it.

If I remember right, 3 minutes per pound, smaller birds better, juice up the breasts with a cattle hypo and marinade of your choice. We used peanut oil for cooking.

I was surprised how moist it turned out.
it's probably terrific, like pretty deep fried anything, but i just can't do it in my own kitchen. submerging food in oil is a bridge too for me...tho i'm sure i'd eat it in an irregular heartbeat.
 

ElOgro

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it's probably terrific, like pretty deep fried anything, but i just can't do it in my own kitchen. submerging food in oil is a bridge too for me...tho i'm sure i'd eat it in an irregular heartbeat.
The oil is hot as you can get it without smoking. It sears the exterior and no juice loss. As in what kelly posted, the key is maintaining the temperature at the right level. Just different. When done properly you’d never guess how it was cooked. You’re in the cacilaca region right? I have friends from there that cooked them up like that.

If you have the space to do it, try it!
 
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billypilgrim

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Apr 19, 2017
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:shaka::shaka: Juicy ftw!

Anyone ever fry ‘em up or is that a southern thing? I had a friend from bumfuck, La. that turned me onto that method. It takes a little gear but the results are worth it.

If I remember right, 3 minutes per pound, smaller birds better, juice up the breasts with a cattle hypo and marinade of your choice. We used peanut oil for cooking.

I was surprised how moist it turned out.
That is the only way to do it as far as I am concerned. A family friend hooks us up with one every year.
 
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