*** The Official Wildland FIRE Thread ***

Chocki

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Feb 18, 2007
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When I worked in Flagstaff there was a guy on our (construction) crew who did fire fighting during the summer (back when fires had seasons). He told me a story about the Native American crews. He said one fire he was on they put the Apache camp near the Navajo camp. The Navajo were not happy about it. Then one morning they (Navajos) woke up and had all had the SAME nightmare. They were totally freaked out about it. They blamed the Apache and moved camp.
 
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One-Off

Tom Curren status
Jul 28, 2005
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33.8N - 118.4W
Them Apaches!

"An Apache crew attacked the fire but seemed to make no progress in containing it. In near desperation, the Apaches withdrew from the fire and began singing. When they returned to the fire, it continued to spread for a few minutes and then, for no apparent natural reason, it “lay down and was easily controlled.”


These two things caught my attention-

1) Then-

"The Mescalero Red Hats, as was true of other Indian crews, viewed firefighting as modern day warfare. The Apaches believed how one approached the fire site was important. One did not walk to the battle site; one trotted in military fashion. As they trotted, the Red Hats sang war songs to help them maintain the pace."

“We had a long uphill hike before we reached the fire line. Me and my crew was so puffed when we got there we couldn’t do a lick of work ‘till we got our wind. But you should have seen those Red Hats. They dogtrotted all the way up the mountain and fell to line building the minute they hit the fire.”


Now (seems to mirror a general trend)-

"In later years, the spiritual aspect of firefighting—particularly among younger firefighters—diminished...":

"The declining use of Indian crews also had other points of origin, including the introduction of fitness tests in the 1970s.

When Indian crews were first organized, firefighters came from a cultural and social background that required a “different lifestyle … [with men] … more involved in physical labor.” When many veteran firefighters began leaving the SWFF program in the late sixties, they were replaced by younger, less physically fit firefighters."

Here's the present test. The one they talk about in the artidle was a "step test." Might havebeen different.
 
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crustBrother

Phil Edwards status
Apr 23, 2001
7,193
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Live Your Life
Chief Tecumseh

So live your life that the fear of death can never enter your heart.
Trouble no one about their religion; respect others in their view,
and demand that they respect yours.
Love your life, perfect your life, beautify all things in your life.
Seek to make your life long and its purpose in the service of your people.

Prepare a noble death song for the day when you go over the great divide.
Always give a word or a sign of salute when meeting or passing a friend,
even a stranger, when in a lonely place.
Show respect to all people and grovel to none.
When you arise in the morning give thanks for the food and for the joy of living.
If you see no reason for giving thanks, the fault lies only in yourself.
Abuse no one and no thing,
for abuse turns the wise ones to fools and robs the spirit of its vision.

When it comes your time to die,
be not like those whose hearts are filled with the fear of death,
so that when their time comes they weep and pray for a little more time
to live their lives over again in a different way.
Sing your death song and die like a hero going home.”
 

Chocki

Miki Dora status
Feb 18, 2007
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Them Apaches!

"An Apache crew attacked the fire but seemed to make no progress in containing it. In near desperation, the Apaches withdrew from the fire and began singing. When they returned to the fire, it continued to spread for a few minutes and then, for no apparent natural reason, it “lay down and was easily controlled.”


These two things caught my attention-

1) Then-

"The Mescalero Red Hats, as was true of other Indian crews, viewed firefighting as modern day warfare. The Apaches believed how one approached the fire site was important. One did not walk to the battle site; one trotted in military fashion. As they trotted, the Red Hats sang war songs to help them maintain the pace."

“We had a long uphill hike before we reached the fire line. Me and my crew was so puffed when we got there we couldn’t do a lick of work ‘till we got our wind. But you should have seen those Red Hats. They dogtrotted all the way up the mountain and fell to line building the minute they hit the fire.”


Now (seems to mirror a general trend)-

"In later years, the spiritual aspect of firefighting—particularly among younger firefighters—diminished...":

"The declining use of Indian crews also had other points of origin, including the introduction of fitness tests in the 1970s.

When Indian crews were first organized, firefighters came from a cultural and social background that required a “different lifestyle … [with men] … more involved in physical labor.” When many veteran firefighters began leaving the SWFF program in the late sixties, they were replaced by younger, less physically fit firefighters."

Here's the present test. The one they talk about in the artidle was a "step test." Might havebeen different.
The only times I heard people talk about the ”Rez crews” it was with the utmost respect and admiration.

 
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One-Off

Tom Curren status
Jul 28, 2005
11,235
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33.8N - 118.4W
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SurfFuerteventura

Phil Edwards status
Sep 20, 2014
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hulling, mostly...
49° C here yesterday. Luckily, no trees. Only rocks n dust which makes it feel hotter still, but you sure appreciate the fact that they only burn after you have already melted to death.

:bricks::mad::mad::mad::crazy2:
 

Firebird

Nep status
Jun 5, 2010
813
385
63
OC
Completed a 24 hour shift this AM.
Nothing extraordinary that you haven't already seen on the news.
It's hot.
The fire is making runs but they are getting dozer line around it.
Gonna sleep the rest of today and tonight and get back out on the line tomorrow.
Oh, and it's beautiful country up here. I'm with my buddies, they are feeding us great, and the work is gratifying.
 

One-Off

Tom Curren status
Jul 28, 2005
11,235
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My hats off the the guys on the line.

I'm wondering what the front line guys think of this? I think the guys on the line's opinion will be MUCH more informed than my own. I tend to write my elected reps when something I care about comes up.



 
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Chocki

Miki Dora status
Feb 18, 2007
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My hats off the the guys on the line.

I'm wondering what the front line guys think of this? I think the guys on the line's opinion will be MUCH more informed than my own. I tend to write my elected reps when something I care about comes up.



 

One-Off

Tom Curren status
Jul 28, 2005
11,235
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33.8N - 118.4W
might be good to throw some medical insurance and retirement benefits in there too
You have the firefighting son? Is he state or federal? Why wouldn't the wildland firefighters not get the same benefits as urban firefighters? Now that the wildfire season is year round?
 

crustBrother

Phil Edwards status
Apr 23, 2001
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You have the firefighting son?
yeah, he's finishing a rollout up in alaska right now
Is he state or federal?
federal
Why wouldn't the wildland firefighters not get the same benefits as urban firefighters?
:shrug: no clue, makes no sense to me, but its pretty cool that there are a bunch of guys and gals that do it even though there is no money in it
Now that the wildfire season is year round?
word. marshall fire in boulder was the most destructive in terms of structures in CO history and happened 12/30/21
 
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SurfFuerteventura

Phil Edwards status
Sep 20, 2014
6,777
2,914
113
hulling, mostly...
Completed a 24 hour shift this AM.
Nothing extraordinary that you haven't already seen on the news.
It's hot.
The fire is making runs but they are getting dozer line around it.
Gonna sleep the rest of today and tonight and get back out on the line tomorrow.
Oh, and it's beautiful country up here. I'm with my buddies, they are feeding us great, and the work is gratifying.
Thank goodness for people like you.

:bowdown::bowdown::bowdown::bowdown::bowdown::bowdown::bowdown::bowdown::bowdown:

:applause2::applause2::applause2::applause2::applause2::applause2::applause2::applause2::applause2: