Poast your strenf training program

One-Off

Tom Curren status
Jul 28, 2005
14,305
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33.8N - 118.4W
What is your concern here?
Doc said not to lift heavy and the reason he gave was the spike in blood pressure. That link was all I could find about blood pressure and weight lifting From a quick google search. I don’t think you can measure it yourself. How could use a sphygmomanometer at the moment of peak effort during a lift?

I think the endothelium responds positively to cardio exercise stress. I’ll have to ask the doc about what happens with the pressure spikes.


Most people can't dead lift 2x their body weight.
Can anybody lift that without training? Maybe naturally big dudes?
 
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PRCD

Tom Curren status
Feb 25, 2020
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Doc said not to lift heavy and the reason he gave was the spike in blood pressure. That link was all I could find about blood pressure and weight lifting From a quick google search. I don’t think you can measure it yourself. How could use a sphygmomanometer at the moment of peak effort during a lift?

I think the endothelium responds positively to cardio exercise stress. I’ll have to ask the doc about what happens with the pressure spikes.
I'm curious how they decided an entirely normal phenomenon is dangerous for you - your circulatory system is designed (by God) to handle high peak pressure - you wouldn't be able to lift anything without taking a big breath before making force. If anything, it's high average pressure that's bad for you. How did they measure the effects of high peak pressure in a controlled setting, or are they just inferring from some other data or rationale?
 
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One-Off

Tom Curren status
Jul 28, 2005
14,305
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33.8N - 118.4W
I'm curious how they decided an entirely normal phenomenon is dangerous for you - your circulatory system is designed (by God) to handle high peak pressure - you wouldn't be able to lift anything without taking a big breath before making force. If anything, it's high average pressure that's bad for you. How did they measure the effects of high peak pressure in a controlled setting, or are they just inferring from some other data or rationale?
It's not entirely normal. I don't know the percentage, but for some it is very debilitating. After I was diagnosed I found the Myocardial Bridge Support Group on facebook and hearing the stories there, I felt pretty damn lucky to have mild symptoms. Most of the people there end up getting the "unbridging" surgery and 90 % of them have to have sternotomy (open heart surgery), which must really suck. There is only one doctor in Chicago who does it laparoscopically. I had mild symptoms (angina) which seems to have responded well to pharmacological therapy (beta blockers), although mine was always "anomalous" and "a mystery." That's because I would get angina at the start of my runs and then after ten minutes it would go away and only come back if I pushed my heart rate. My MD said maybe the other arteries take up the slack. His response to my running was, "Wear a heart rate monitor, don't go over 80% of max HR and walk or stop if you get any chest pain." He also told me to run with a dose of aspirin in mu pocket, just in case. I thought he was pretty conservative so I got a second opinion from the leading MD on the condition, a Dr. Schnittger at Stanford. She had a more ominous explanation for why the pain went away- endorphins are masking the pain. She told me not to run at all. I went with my MD's advice. I've been running problem free ever since. I have found articles on "capillarization" and "corollary coronary arteries" which seem to support my MD's theory. One reason I'm so obsessed about cardio training protocols is because of that.

FYI-




Corollary arterial development-



Bottom line- exercise is good for you.


I wrote all that, and then realized by "normal" you were talking about the pressure spike. I'm not sure the reasoning behind that. They obviously never tested me for high spikes. My next visit I'll ask why it is a risk. I was also told initially to avoid going over 80% of Max HR. I've been doing intervals now for about a year. I'll have to tell MD.
 
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PRCD

Tom Curren status
Feb 25, 2020
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It's not entirely normal. I don't know the percentage, but for some it is very debilitating. After I was diagnosed I found the Myocardial Bridge Support Group on facebook and hearing the stories there, I felt pretty damn lucky to have mild symptoms. Most of the people there end up getting the "unbridging" surgery and 90 % of them have to have sternotomy (open heart surgery), which must really suck. There is only one doctor in Chicago who does it laparoscopically. I had mild symptoms (angina) which seems to have responded well to pharmacological therapy (beta blockers), although mine was always "anomalous" and "a mystery." That's because I would get angina at the start of my runs and then after ten minutes it would go away and only come back if I pushed my heart rate. My MD said maybe the other arteries take up the slack. His response to my running was, "Wear a heart rate monitor, don't go over 80% of max HR and walk or stop if you get any chest pain." He also told me to run with a dose of aspirin in mu pocket, just in case. I thought he was pretty conservative so I got a second opinion from the leading MD on the condition, a Dr. Schnittger at Stanford. She had a more ominous explanation for why the pain went away- endorphins are masking the pain. She told me not to run at all. I went with my MD's advice. I've been running problem free ever since. I have found articles on "capillarization" and "corollary coronary arteries" which seem to support my MD's theory. One reason I'm so obsessed about cardio training protocols is because of that.

FYI-




Corollary arterial development-



Bottom line- exercise is good for you.


I wrote all that, and then realized by "normal" you were talking about the pressure spike. I'm not sure the reasoning behind that. They obviously never tested me for high spikes. My next visit I'll ask why it is a risk. I was also told initially to avoid going over 80% of Max HR. I've been doing intervals now for about a year. I'll have to tell MD.
I remember you saying you went out in big surf last winter and now you’re doing HIIT. I bet your heart rate has gone above 80% plenty of times. as to whether weights would be a problem - the circulatory system adapts along with the other systems in response to overload just like it adapts in response to running or energy systems work (HIIT). Doctors seem to make a lot of judgments without data or controlled studies out of precaution and precaution has a lot of its own downsides. Ergonomics is one example - they’ve convinced us we need it to keep from damaging ourselves while we work at desks yet they can’t say what proper posture is. Meanwhile they convince everyone sitting is dangerous which becomes a self-fulfilling prophecy.
 

One-Off

Tom Curren status
Jul 28, 2005
14,305
10,563
113
33.8N - 118.4W
I remember you saying you went out in big surf last winter and now you’re doing HIIT. I bet your heart rate has gone above 80% plenty of times. as to whether weights would be a problem - the circulatory system adapts along with the other systems in response to overload just like it adapts in response to running or energy systems work (HIIT). Doctors seem to make a lot of judgments without data or controlled studies out of precaution and precaution has a lot of its own downsides. Ergonomics is one example - they’ve convinced us we need it to keep from damaging ourselves while we work at desks yet they can’t say what proper posture is. Meanwhile they convince everyone sitting is dangerous which becomes a self-fulfilling prophecy.
Yeah, and at one point after taking ten waves on the head during what seemed like a never ending set, I started getting dizzy. I was about to turn and head to shore when the set finally relented. I’ve wondered what was going on, if it was just fatigue, oxygen depletion and totally normal, or if it was related to the bridge. But the bridge would restrict blood to the heart not the brain, so maybe I was just getting a good old fashioned rinse. It’s a mystery.
 

PRCD

Tom Curren status
Feb 25, 2020
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Yeah, and at one point after taking ten waves on the head during what seemed like a never ending set, I started getting dizzy. I was about to turn and head to shore when the set finally relented. I’ve wondered what was going on, if it was just fatigue, oxygen depletion and totally normal, or if it was related to the bridge. But the bridge would restrict blood to the heart not the brain, so maybe I was just getting a good old fashioned rinse. It’s a mystery.
Anxiety, low oxygen and high C02 can definitely do that haha. Did you experience any of those things while taking 10 waves on the head?
 
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PRCD

Tom Curren status
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I rate this video 11 out of 10. TL DR is most strength and conditioning research is poor quality - inclusion/exclusion criteria are weak, program design is bad and lacks correlation with commonly-used programs for athletics or hypertrophy, statistical power is low, repeatability is nil (journals won't even publish replication studies), and - at the end of the day - most of what it shows is that volume is king for either strength or hypertrophy.

Israetel's stuff is the most scientific and also the best.

 

PRCD

Tom Curren status
Feb 25, 2020
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Vermbraunt's assessment is right. Realistically, there's only so much you can use your brain for hard tasks every day before your neurotransmitters are temporarily depleted. If Bill Guppy had ever thought hard, he'd know that. Meanwhile, there is no dichotomy between the body and mind - both are essential.
 
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Autoprax

Duke status
Jan 24, 2011
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Mastering heavy weight lifting made it so I could go back to college (despite my monumental learning disabilities) and become the great mind you see here today.

What is learning but intense training?

Those last two reps that you don't want to do are the key to everything.
 
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One-Off

Tom Curren status
Jul 28, 2005
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Chocki

Phil Edwards status
Feb 18, 2007
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Planet Earth
What do you actually DO? You’re always posting up all kinds of eclectic sh!t. You can’t possibly be doing all that stuff on a regular basis.
1706548285958.jpeg

Kidding not kidding lol. Depends on the day or depends on the season. Dojo is stocked with all the fun stuff, ropes, kbs, rings, punching bags etc. so it’s easy to mix it up.

Rn Id like to start snowboarding as much as possible along with trying to regain the conditioning I lost from being sick so I was thinking about working 100x kb swings coupled with rings and parallettes on days im not riding or recovering. I was thinking since I’m back to square one working on bw upper body to start.
 
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PRCD

Tom Curren status
Feb 25, 2020
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What do you actually DO? You’re always posting up all kinds of eclectic sh!t. You can’t possibly be doing all that stuff on a regular basis.
Do random stuff, get random results. Personally I’m fine with these calisthenics and gymnastic exercises. The rope tricks can reduce pain by virtue of the fact that they’re novel movements the mind finds interesting. However none of these are superior forms of exercise and their gurus are just trying to carve out a living in a crowded field. If you’ve got long legs that you’ve added muscle to, you’re going to find gymnastic exercises frustrating.
 
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One-Off

Tom Curren status
Jul 28, 2005
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Do random stuff, get random results. Personally I’m fine with these calisthenics and gymnastic exercises. The rope tricks can reduce pain by virtue of the fact that they’re novel movements the mind finds interesting. However none of these are superior forms of exercise and their gurus are just trying to carve out a living in a crowded field. If you’ve got long legs that you’ve added muscle to, you’re going to find gymnastic exercises frustrating.
Random results are better than no results and something is always better than nothing. And a guy's gotta make a buck.


Hey PRCD, do you think neck movements/stretches can overcome cervical radiculopathy the way exercising acclimitizes the lower back to "false" signals? I've been reluctant to do neck extension stretches and exercises because I thought it would just make it worse, but maybe that's old school thinking. Or is the pinching of the nerve always going to produce a nerve reponse in the assicated muscle (I get pain in my trap when holding my head up while paddling)?
 

Autoprax

Duke status
Jan 24, 2011
69,074
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62
Vagina Point
What about a pad under your chest?

It's old guy sh!t but if you want to keep surfing.

Also, work on your t-spine mobility so the next doesn't have to work so hard.

The weird thing about the t-spine is that is will loosen up when you brace your core.
 

averagejoe

Miki Dora status
May 28, 2008
5,289
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So far away
www.mardawg.com
here's my current program:

i lifted a couple of routines from the Squatober program and they're my focus right now. my split is Bench/Squat or OHP/Deadlift. The workouts rotate between 5x5 or Ladder, using increasing % of 1RM. Lifting M-W-F

5x5:
63%
73%
75%
77% x 2

Ladder:
10@55% x 2
7@67%x2
5@75%x2
3@83%x2
1@90%

i'm adjusting the 1RM up by 3-5% each week

i'm also doing 3x30 minutes on the rowing machine in Zone 2 and walking a mile or more with 20 lbs in a ruck 5x/week

currently at 18% body fat - cutting down to 15% at most and 12% would be my stretch goal
i'll be 52 yrs old in a couple weeks and i'm weighing in at 180 right now
 
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scdad

Legend (inyourownmind)
Mar 20, 2003
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San Clemente, CA
Seems similar to me. I ran Squatober in January, and was impressed. As a 53 yr old, I made it into the 1000lb club after that month. A fun challenge to compete with my kids. Now I'm about maintaining and endurance work to prepare for a season of hiking and surfing.