Navy SEALS - cheating and PEDS?

Autoprax

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Jan 24, 2011
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Within the context of this post, this is such a relevant and fascinating post. You are always spot on.

In terms of always talking about yourself.
I was responding to Ifallalot's post.

My favorite threads are the ones that take a turn.

The Italians had a term of this term "the Volta."

Any good good art has a turn.

Not that my posts are art.

But . . .

You are what you do.

I'm not sure what you are doing, Clay.

Venting off trauma?

Good!
 
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JKH

Jan 27, 2020
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I have experience in both. Played D1 sports in college, then minor leagues. Did the recruiter's dance just over 20 years ago and got picked up for teams and naval aviation. Went the latter, so thank you for the kind words. When they retired my jet I decided not to take a transition and went to SOCOM world. Deployed with both SEAL and ODA downrange but I am not an operator.

Back in the locker room playing in both college and pro we'd pop Sudafeds like candy for the jolt and to open your breathing...there's a lot of stuff one will do, operators do the same. We always had "go pills" for the over the beach missions at night off the boat and then downers for after we landed. There is a viciousness and an intensity in professional sports (or getting there) and there is also that in war. If you are not that, then you probably do not belong there, and as evidenced in this story, there are guys who make it through.

To go through all three phases and then the follow on training to earn a trident or a green beret takes a long time, then there's all the training after that, if you fail at you will get kicked out. For me flight school was just under three years, then another year at the RAG (flight school again for your platform) then to get to the fleet and be a FNG and go through another syllabus of training in the squadron, then weapons school; always being evaluated, always being harassed about the smallest mistake, kinda easy to get cocky. Hell, there is a TOPGUN manual on briefing and the color of the markers to use on a white board, and you better use the right ones. Most are cocky internally with their squadron and team, sometimes for some it bleeds out. But it is like med school-surgeon residency, level of marathon-length training.

Most people want cocky surgeons. People in this country should feel good we produce people like that. The jerk offs you see around Coronado/SD spouting team stuff are dropouts with the same lines as the myriad of guys I have met in the navy who were in flight school but "got screwed" at some point. There's one in every crowd.
 

Bayview

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Dec 21, 2009
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My buddies son is a SEAL. He's been deployed to SE Asia the past 6 months and still is.

He's been all over the Middle East on deployments. He's 6 years in.

I've met most of his SEAL team mates. All very strong in body, character and mind.

Every one of those young men that I have met are solid humans and committed to their cause and objective.

You have to have the stead fast want and desire to do the job. That is why so few make it the distance in the training.

I can't think of a finer bunch of Patriots and I fear for their safety daily.

It's a lot different when you know a boy that you were uncle to that is now out there doing this work for the greater good.

I'm actually mystified at some of the comments towards the SEAL team members and their chosen military duty as the best of the best.

I don't give a husky fook what they use to make it through what they go through.

All I can do at this point is hope and pray that he can come home safe.

If you think these guys are bad or bullies I think you need to actually talk to one before you make a decision of what they are really like.

Every single one I have spoken to were straight up committed to the job and all were gentlemen... until it gets real and then they are straight up savages. :jamon:
Amen. Great description.

I don't know the emotional feeling (Autoprax?) to describe being anxious but not letting it get in the way of life, not occupying conscious or subconscious but being top of mind, not worrying but worrying and not getting depressed or getting down. My experience from a little kid through today with current family. Going to bed, waking up to my pops gone & not knowing when he'd be home. being an 0-6 didn't guarantee coming home alive 6 months later. i think the piece of mind was knowing he wanted to be there, voluntarily accepting of "it" and everyone else around him did as well. committed.

patstone had a buncha great one liners and wisdom
 
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bluemarlin04

Michael Peterson status
Aug 13, 2015
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The military has been pretty notorious for feeding troops stimulants/drugs.

By any means necessary I suppose.

There‘s no such thing as cheating in war.

Besides, the vast majority of our nations youth are too fat and fvcked up to even make it out of a recruiters office much less make it into a SOG. Better living through chemistry?
I was as conventional as can be. Medic in Iraq. We would buy hydoxycut and take them to stay awake. The demands were just so much that no human could survive without some type of “help”.

even the guys with vices, when their reality set in, they caved too.

The non conventional forces? Straight up drugs everywhere
 
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bluemarlin04

Michael Peterson status
Aug 13, 2015
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I have experience in both. Played D1 sports in college, then minor leagues. Did the recruiter's dance just over 20 years ago and got picked up for teams and naval aviation. Went the latter, so thank you for the kind words. When they retired my jet I decided not to take a transition and went to SOCOM world. Deployed with both SEAL and ODA downrange but I am not an operator.

Back in the locker room playing in both college and pro we'd pop Sudafeds like candy for the jolt and to open your breathing...there's a lot of stuff one will do, operators do the same. We always had "go pills" for the over the beach missions at night off the boat and then downers for after we landed. There is a viciousness and an intensity in professional sports (or getting there) and there is also that in war. If you are not that, then you probably do not belong there, and as evidenced in this story, there are guys who make it through.

To go through all three phases and then the follow on training to earn a trident or a green beret takes a long time, then there's all the training after that, if you fail at you will get kicked out. For me flight school was just under three years, then another year at the RAG (flight school again for your platform) then to get to the fleet and be a FNG and go through another syllabus of training in the squadron, then weapons school; always being evaluated, always being harassed about the smallest mistake, kinda easy to get cocky. Hell, there is a TOPGUN manual on briefing and the color of the markers to use on a white board, and you better use the right ones. Most are cocky internally with their squadron and team, sometimes for some it bleeds out. But it is like med school-surgeon residency, level of marathon-length training.

Most people want cocky surgeons. People in this country should feel good we produce people like that. The jerk offs you see around Coronado/SD spouting team stuff are dropouts with the same lines as the myriad of guys I have met in the navy who were in flight school but "got screwed" at some point. There's one in every crowd.
I get it.

But we can’t also ignore reality- the majority of pointy nose guys ARE NOT D1 athletes. They were complete dorks who now take on their new Fighter persona and it rubs people the wrong way.

Of course it’s hard to be a fighter pilot but the way it consumes many of the first tour pilots who haven’t even done a production tour or even a deployment rubs many wrong.
 

$kully

Duke status
Feb 27, 2009
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Who cares?

Why should we not take advantage of modern science to achieve peak performance?
What if I told you that one of the side effects of roids is shrunken
testicles and growing bitch t!ts? Isn’t that your worst nightmare?
 
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santacruzin

Phil Edwards status
Oct 17, 2007
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You have to build up slowly.

The thought of doing 3-4 shakes a day was really distasteful to me a few months ago.

If I want to get a gram per ideal body weight will in a slight calorie deficit, it's the only way.

I was able to do the deficit, but I was way low on my protein and I've been lifting 4 days a week.

So I'm doing a shake in the morning with 60 grams in the morning.

Then another 40 in the afternoon.

The rest I can get from food.

I'm eating more lean protein in food form too.

My advice is to count calories and protein and eat what you want.

That is a game changer.
Drink egg whites
 

santacruzin

Phil Edwards status
Oct 17, 2007
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My buddies son is a SEAL. He's been deployed to SE Asia the past 6 months and still is.

He's been all over the Middle East on deployments. He's 6 years in.

I've met most of his SEAL team mates. All very strong in body, character and mind.

Every one of those young men that I have met are solid humans and committed to their cause and objective.

You have to have the stead fast want and desire to do the job. That is why so few make it the distance in the training.

I can't think of a finer bunch of Patriots and I fear for their safety daily.

It's a lot different when you know a boy that you were uncle to that is now out there doing this work for the greater good.

I'm actually mystified at some of the comments towards the SEAL team members and their chosen military duty as the best of the best.

I don't give a husky fook what they use to make it through what they go through.

All I can do at this point is hope and pray that he can come home safe.

If you think these guys are bad or bullies I think you need to actually talk to one before you make a decision of what they are really like.

Every single one I have spoken to were straight up committed to the job and all were gentlemen... until it gets real and then they are straight up savages. :jamon:
One of my child hood friends was a seal, he was one of the best men I ever met. Growing up he always wanted to be in military. He was nice and polite to everyone, liked by all. He really had good character.

He passed in Afghanistan in operation red wings. Miss that dude.

I agree Keen I also don’t get some of the comments here, typical erbb.
 

20W-50 and blood

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uhh....not the biggest fan of the services and whatnot...but arent these guys supposed to be nothing if not savages?

as well.....wasn't blitzkreig accomplished basically through meth? wheres kento when you njeed him?
 

TeamScam

Miki Dora status
Jan 14, 2002
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I'm running on empty every other day it's hard to do. I would take hard-core enhancers if I could. Just to be me. I ain't no randy savage.
Per the topic, keenfishs' post was what I'd suspect most of those guys would be like. I know a kid who couldn't become a coastguard rescue swimmer, and he is quite a guy, so that's tough to achieve even getting a chance at that. Somebody's got to do it, it's sure not me.
 

casa_mugrienta

Duke status
Apr 13, 2008
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Simple question…

Why shouldn’t they use PEDs?
I was as conventional as can be. Medic in Iraq. We would buy hydoxycut and take them to stay awake. The demands were just so much that no human could survive without some type of “help”.

even the guys with vices, when their reality set in, they caved too.

The non conventional forces? Straight up drugs everywhere
Not saying they shouldn't.

From my experience with friends and family in the Navy and Marines is there was pretty much a zero tolerance policy towards controlled substances and those who were caught distributing were locked up for a looooooooong time.

So I'm surprised it's so known and accepted in this branch. How hard is it to find a doc that will give you a scrip at a young age?
 
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Duffy LaCoronilla

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Apr 27, 2016
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Not saying they shouldn't.

From my experience with friends and family in the Navy and Marines is there was pretty much a zero tolerance policy towards controlled substances and those who were caught distributing were locked up for a looooooooong time.

So I'm surprised it's so known and accepted in this branch. How hard is it to find a doc that will give you a scrip at a young age?
OTC in TJ.
 

JKH

Jan 27, 2020
38
112
33
I get it.

But we can’t also ignore reality- the majority of pointy nose guys ARE NOT D1 athletes. They were complete dorks who now take on their new Fighter persona and it rubs people the wrong way.

Of course it’s hard to be a fighter pilot but the way it consumes many of the first tour pilots who haven’t even done a production tour or even a deployment rubs many wrong.
That's fair and true. The athlete thing was said more for teams/drugs. I said I didn't take a transition to a new jet, the communities just weren't the same anymore. Nuggets, regardless of skill, need a few late, stormy nights behind the boat to change their ways.
 

JKH

Jan 27, 2020
38
112
33
I was as conventional as can be. Medic in Iraq. We would buy hydoxycut and take them to stay awake. The demands were just so much that no human could survive without some type of “help”.

even the guys with vices, when their reality set in, they caved too.

The non conventional forces? Straight up drugs everywhere
Besides 27 ripits/wild tigers a day and two cans of copenhagen.