modern longboard dims?

maybe

Michael Peterson status
Jul 23, 2011
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I have a couple of "relatively" new logs that are fun for the small days - but they are thick and heavy.

I see some of these logging videos and granted, I realize guys like Tyler Warren, Al Knost, and others are very good surfers - but they are able to fling their longboards around pretty effortlessly, and they aren't big dudes.

So the question is... do these guys get bladed out logs with paper thin glassing to whip their boards around so easily? My last log ordered was 9'5" x 22" x 3" with double 6 top and bottom glassing.

I know I am setting myself up for heckling with this post, but whatevs...:roflmao:
 

sushipop

Michael Peterson status
Feb 7, 2008
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The Dagobah System
1 word for you: Jefferson Dead Lifts
Additional 3 words for you: spend time learning how to properly ride a log
Follow these words and you'll start flinging that thing around more than you fling your pecker
 
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Jul 1, 2009
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to use a bicycle analogy: logs are easier to turn when they are 'on a glide' (my shitty term) i.e. they have reached a minimum speed and commensurate momentum. I don't know... maybe once they are on glide they lift sufficiently out the water to be turnable?

Easiest way to visualize this phenomena is look at how Tyler Warren is already taking off with momentum and he can easily lean board over. Then compare that to trying a sink the tail takeoff with the lip.

I have a couple of "relatively" new logs that are fun for the small days - but they are thick and heavy.

I see some of these logging videos and granted, I realize guys like Tyler Warren, Al Knost, and others are very good surfers - but they are able to fling their longboards around pretty effortlessly, and they aren't big dudes.

So the question is... do these guys get bladed out logs with paper thin glassing to whip their boards around so easily? My last log ordered was 9'5" x 22" x 3" with double 6 top and bottom glassing.

I know I am setting myself up for heckling with this post, but whatevs...:roflmao:
 
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Senor Sopa

Billy Hamilton status
Mar 11, 2015
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Ponto
to use a bicycle analogy: logs are easier to turn when they are 'on a glide' (my shitty term) i.e. they have reached a minimum speed and commensurate momentum. I don't know... maybe once they are on glide they lift sufficiently out the water to be turnable?

Easiest way to visualize this phenomena is look at how Tyler Warren is already taking off with momentum and he can easily lean board over. Then compare that to trying a sink the tail takeoff with the lip.
All boars need a minimum speed. Longboars just need less. One needs timing too. The longboar reacts slower, so it's easy to miss the turn zone.
 

jory

OTF status
Aug 13, 2006
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Go and have a look at the Thomas website and some pics of Michael takayama boards. Those two represent where modern “logs” are pretty much.

The Michael boards are insane noseriders but don’t turn that well ( unless you are Veedster )

The Thomas templates are where most of the boards you are thinking of are coming from. Ozzie influenced, widepoint back, slightly narrower nosed, not glassed super heavy and more foiled than a seedling era log. Most of their boards are under 3 thick and under 23 wide.

The new Wayne Rich shaped CI log is glassed 6+6 deck and 6 bottom I think for example.

Fins wise they are mostly using some variant of a greenough 4a instead of the pivot style fins that were popular in the nuuhiwa style parallel template longboards.

Also there’s technique obviously, getting your weight over the fin, moving around the board smoothly and quickly to make the most of the momentum and speed you have.
 
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Fins wise they are mostly using some variant of a greenough 4a instead of the pivot style fins that were popular in the nuuhiwa style parallel template longboards.
Not disputing that there a lot of variants of the Greenough 4a out there (and for good reason), but checking out the logs lined up on the beach during the Duct Tape Invitational and local log contests the fin choice was all over the spectrum. Equal mix of 4a's, raked pivot, upright hatchets, etc...
 

jory

OTF status
Aug 13, 2006
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Not disputing that there a lot of variants of the Greenough 4a out there (and for good reason), but checking out the logs lined up on the beach during the Duct Tape Invitational and local log contests the fin choice was all over the spectrum. Equal mix of 4a's, raked pivot, upright hatchets, etc...
I’m sure!

A lot of fin choice is how you want things to feel and the lines you want to draw so personal preference

I was mainly referring to the modern piggish template Thomas / CI log kind of templates using 4a ish templates.

Most of the Michael boards seem to use something that looks like a DT flex, so more rake than a 4a and carrying the width all the way up.

http://instagr.am/p/CLVRaPdnLWi/
 

Homie

Miki Dora status
Sep 2, 2005
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So the question is... do these guys get bladed out logs with paper thin glassing to whip their boards around so easily? My last log ordered was 9'5" x 22" x 3" with double 6 top and bottom glassing.
I was checking out this longboard the other day that was made for a pro female longboarded. The rails were aggressive, the board was super light for a longboard and epoxy. Looked really cool!

https://usedsurf.com/92-martin-used-surfboard-35317/




 

maybe

Michael Peterson status
Jul 23, 2011
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Nice post Homie. I've never come across a longboard that bladed out. I was thinking about finding a triple stringer log blank and going thin with it. I'm not a fan of modern longboarding where the person tries to ride a log like a shortboard - but I still want a lighter, more responsive board. Would appreciate any reponses from shapers out there.

I'll have to make it to the next local Duct Tape to learn more
 
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Bullnutts

Gerry Lopez status
Nov 14, 2004
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Find a light board first and ride it a few times. And in different conditions too. You may find out you like the extra weight,. . For the guys I surf with, it's about 1/3 on liking the lighter longboard. Plenty bought a light one, like the Thunderbolt one, and after riding it a few times, got rid of it. They settled on a heavier one, all of which are poly. I have a solid big. thick gloss polish 9'2 that turns on a dime. Wider and thicker than your last board. My friend rode it, he's 170, and even he got the board to one oclock on his forehand. As Minami says, 90% of the board is in the bottom. Or something like that.