Longest resting underwater breath hold?

casa_mugrienta

Duke status
Apr 13, 2008
44,576
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Petak Island
What's your longest?

I can remember my dad used to do 50m underwater no fins pretty easy. He never had any apnea training.

I've done a 1:47 pretty easy, going to try to do 2 mins today. Working my way up slowly not pushing it.
 

Autoprax

Duke status
Jan 24, 2011
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Vagina Point
repeating a story . . .

I'm in bed with my best girl in the morning. I tell her I used to do three minutes. I would lie on the bottom of the pool with a weight on my chest with my water proof watch. High tech in the 70s.

She says BS.

Then she gets her watch and does 2:45.

Then she hands me a watch.

I'm like, fuck.

I did three but it sucked. It hurt my lungs.
 
Last edited:

sdsrfr

Phil Edwards status
Jul 13, 2020
6,166
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San Diego
just over 2.5min with a breathe up, someone was giving me a tap every 30s and I freaked out knowing where I got to. It was my first try.

never bothered to time myself again.

i think out the steps to change a flat tire.
 

kelpcutter

Billy Hamilton status
Aug 24, 2008
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In high school we used to swim laps under water to see who could go the longest. I remember swimming six or eight lengths of the pool (200m) until you're seeing stars and have to give up and take a breath. Maybe 2.5 - 3+ minutes. Learned quickly it was not about speed. A relaxed and efficient glide preserving air and energy was most effective. Might be able to do 1.5-2 minutes now, resting.
 

sussle

Rabbitt Bartholomew status
Oct 11, 2009
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1.5-2 minutes in a pool with no training. always wanted to get better at it, though. however, a few years ago some neighborhood 12 y/o challenged me to a breath holding contest in the HOA pool and i destroyed him in front of a few other kids and it was probabaly the highlight of my 50's.
yes, i'm that pathetic.:trout:
 

bluengreen

Michael Peterson status
Oct 22, 2018
1,774
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SF x Encinitas
hyperventilation helps, but it's not good for you.

had some friends in the medicine tell me that shallow drowning is on the rise given the new fad in breath-work.
 

sussle

Rabbitt Bartholomew status
Oct 11, 2009
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hyperventilation helps, but it's not good for you.

had some friends in the medicine tell me that shallow drowning is on the rise given the new fad in breath-work.
Why is hyperventilation not good for you? That's my secret weapon in competitive breath-holding situations with children.
 

Woke AF

Tom Curren status
Jul 29, 2009
11,852
8,531
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Southern Tip, Norcal
What's your longest?

I can remember my dad used to do 50m underwater no fins pretty easy. He never had any apnea training.

I've done a 1:47 pretty easy, going to try to do 2 mins today. Working my way up slowly not pushing it.
Don't push it w/o a safety person who has been trained on what to do if you blackout or LMC. You could die .

3:20 is my longest
I stopped training for depth or length but for the quality of the dive. 50m w/o fins is impressive. I've seen people blackout attempting less.
 
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Woke AF

Tom Curren status
Jul 29, 2009
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Why is hyperventilation not good for you? That's my secret weapon in competitive breath-holding situations with children.
hyperventilating before a breath-hold is bad. From the AIDA Freedive manual:



Simply defined, hyperventilation is in- and exhaling more air than you need to maintain a neutral level of CO2 in your blood.
Of course this definition depends greatly on your current state of activity. In a relaxation exercise while lying on your bed you are barely producing CO2, whereas in a 400m sprint you produce such big amounts that your breathing cannot catch up with exhaling enough of it. In the first case any audible breath would already considered to be hyperventilation, while it is not possible to hyperventilate during the 400m run.
No additional O2 storage

With an Oximeter the Oxygen saturation of your blood can be measured by attaching it to your finger. at at any given time your blood is saturated with Oxygen levels at around 96-99%. If you are significantly below that reading you are either exerted and need to rest or you are sick and should consult a doctor.

You can prove to not be able to increase the readings by hyperventilating with the Oximeter still on your finger. the reading remains more or less steady. You cannot put more tea in a cup that is already full. Sometimes the blood saturation with Oxygen might increase by one percent, but at a great cost: You have to literally over-exert yourself with breathing!

after all, hyperventilation does not store more Oxygen in your blood!

Negative effects of hyperventilation

In the breath hold exercise mentioned earlier it was not possible to do extend the





Feeling the water carrying you helps to relax







36









AIDA2 MANUAL CHAPTER 04





breath hold indefinitely because of the rising level of CO2. But by hyperventilating before the experiment it is possible that you pass out from low Oxygen levels without even feeling the first signal of rising CO2. hyperventilation can postpone the signals of rising CO2 to such an extent! hyperventilation does not store more Oxygen, it actually lowers the level of CO2.

If you pass out while your face is submerged, you will not unconsciously inhale water, but simply die after a few minutes. Only a buddy watching over you at all times and performing a timely rescue if needed will save you from this ill fate. this is the main reason why hyperventilating before freediving is so dangerous.

apart from the potentially fatal danger, hyperventilation has other disadvantages for breath holding. hyperventilation raises the heart rate, which goes against the goal of starting a breath hold in the most relaxed state as possible. hyperventilation also reduces the blood flow to the brain while increasing it towards the extremities. Once you have started your breath hold, your body will need to reverse this process to conserve Oxygen (see the chapter about the “Mammalian Dive response” in aIDa4). In short, in a breath hold after hyperventilation, your body will not conserve Oxygen as much as it potentially could and is thus using up its Oxygen reserves faster. You can black out earlier than you would have in a completely relaxed state.
 
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sussle

Rabbitt Bartholomew status
Oct 11, 2009
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hyperventilating before a breath-hold is bad. From the AIDA Freedive manual:



Simply defined, hyperventilation is in- and exhaling more air than you need to maintain a neutral level of CO2 in your blood.
Of course this definition depends greatly on your current state of activity. In a relaxation exercise while lying on your bed you are barely producing CO2, whereas in a 400m sprint you produce such big amounts that your breathing cannot catch up with exhaling enough of it. In the first case any audible breath would already considered to be hyperventilation, while it is not possible to hyperventilate during the 400m run.
No additional O2 storage

With an Oximeter the Oxygen saturation of your blood can be measured by attaching it to your finger. at at any given time your blood is saturated with Oxygen levels at around 96-99%. If you are significantly below that reading you are either exerted and need to rest or you are sick and should consult a doctor.

You can prove to not be able to increase the readings by hyperventilating with the Oximeter still on your finger. the reading remains more or less steady. You cannot put more tea in a cup that is already full. Sometimes the blood saturation with Oxygen might increase by one percent, but at a great cost: You have to literally over-exert yourself with breathing!

after all, hyperventilation does not store more Oxygen in your blood!

Negative effects of hyperventilation

In the breath hold exercise mentioned earlier it was not possible to do extend the





Feeling the water carrying you helps to relax







36









AIDA2 MANUAL CHAPTER 04





breath hold indefinitely because of the rising level of CO2. But by hyperventilating before the experiment it is possible that you pass out from low Oxygen levels without even feeling the first signal of rising CO2. hyperventilation can postpone the signals of rising CO2 to such an extent! hyperventilation does not store more Oxygen, it actually lowers the level of CO2.

If you pass out while your face is submerged, you will not unconsciously inhale water, but simply die after a few minutes. Only a buddy watching over you at all times and performing a timely rescue if needed will save you from this ill fate. this is the main reason why hyperventilating before freediving is so dangerous.

apart from the potentially fatal danger, hyperventilation has other disadvantages for breath holding. hyperventilation raises the heart rate, which goes against the goal of starting a breath hold in the most relaxed state as possible. hyperventilation also reduces the blood flow to the brain while increasing it towards the extremities. Once you have started your breath hold, your body will need to reverse this process to conserve Oxygen (see the chapter about the “Mammalian Dive response” in aIDa4). In short, in a breath hold after hyperventilation, your body will not conserve Oxygen as much as it potentially could and is thus using up its Oxygen reserves faster. You can black out earlier than you would have in a completely relaxed state.
Gotcha :shaka:
 
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r32

Administrator
Staff member
Apr 1, 2005
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in my 20s, at my peak, about 2.30 to 3.

now... not even 2. Maybe not even 1.5.

pathetic, but such is life as we age.
 

Eimeo

OTF status
Oct 18, 2005
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I have never understood, is the Wim Hof method basically hyperventilating? If so, and that is supposedly bad, how does it help him and others hold their breath for so long?
 
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r32

Administrator
Staff member
Apr 1, 2005
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I have never understood, is the Wim Hof method basically hyperventilating? If so, and that is supposedly bad, how does it help him and others hold their breath for so long?
I could be mistaken here, but I don't think the Wim Hof method is about being able to hold your breath longer. It's about increasing your ability too control your body's response to stressful situations.
 
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