Is it possible to rip on a mid-length?

Duffy LaCoronilla

Duke status
Apr 27, 2016
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Surfing is a personal pursuit. If you’re having fun in the lineup and not bothering anyone/being a nuisance/wave hog then what is the problem?

If you wanna surf a 10’6 or a 5’6 it’s all good.

Surfers put way too much stock into what others will think of them.

Majority are just trying to have fun and aren’t going to get paid for it
Sure but it’s almost always more fun if you are using appropriate equipment.
 

Senor Sopa

Gerry Lopez status
Mar 11, 2015
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Ponto
Surfing is a personal pursuit. If you’re having fun in the lineup and not bothering anyone/being a nuisance/wave hog then what is the problem?

Surfers put way too much stock into what others will think of them.
True. However, if the crowd deems your surfing "sucky" or "wasting waves", you will soon find the task of catching waves to yourself much more difficult.

This guy surfs well, board looked kind of stiff. He's probably capable of higher levels of rippage.


This guy also surfs really well, he was pretty much ripping (and probably owning it too). Notice his board not wanting to come back down when he hit the lip though.

This guy surfs poorly. Board looks doggy doo.
 
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Duffy LaCoronilla

Duke status
Apr 27, 2016
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Of course it is.

But a mid length, longboard and Shortboard are so distinctly different that one is not necessarily better then the other
When factoring in conditions, skill level, intent and design qualities there absolutely is a hierarchy of what’s better.

Two foot onshore slop for an adult learner a wavestorm beats a Proton all day.
 

bluemarlin04

Michael Peterson status
Aug 13, 2015
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True. However, if the crowd deems your surfing "sucky" or "wasting waves", you will soon find the task of catching waves to yourself much more difficult.


This guy surfs well, board looked kind of stiff. He's probably capable of higher levels of rippage.


This guy also surfs really well, he was pretty much ripping (and probably owning it too). Notice his board not wanting to come back down when he hit the lip though.

This guy surfs poorly. Board looks doggy doo.
All talk.

You’re prob think being good at surfing matters.

I know your type.
 
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bluemarlin04

Michael Peterson status
Aug 13, 2015
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When factoring in conditions, skill level, intent and design qualities there absolutely is a hierarchy of what’s better.

Two foot onshore slop for an adult learner a wavestorm beats a Proton all day.
Sure. But the same could be said about competent surfers.

Is a HPS the best choice on a day with 2 ft slop?
 

GWS_2

Miki Dora status
Aug 3, 2019
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I used to be in a position where I could surf good waves entirely alone for weeks. No one else in sight for weeks at a time. The longer I was alone, the more my surfing would change. Waves were plentiful. You start paddling through perfect waves just limping along out on the shoulder because you want the view of the tube and there's another one behind it. And another one behind that one. And something happens to your surfing. As you get more tired, more satiated and lulled into complacency you start leaving your more effort filled "ripping" maneuvers behind. You want to go fast, hit big turns, enjoy that pressure, that flow, let the wave dictate the most efficient path, look for that tube, kick out of the wave on the inside, turn the board towards the outside and stand there feeling the speed bleed off as you look at the oncoming empty waves.

And at the time, the above is SO not what I was into. In a crowded aggressive pack of good surfers I would more than rise to the occasion. But net net, during those periods of isolation I developed this theory. We all have the fantasy of being alone on a desert island with a few boards and endless perfect/empty surf. My theory was that eventually your surfing would change. It would be less about "performance" and more about finding the speed and flow with as little effort as possible. Surfing without an audience changed your surfing. And how fvcked up is that really?

I'm not sure where I was going with all that. I was going to relate the above to midsize surfing and the modern surfer feeling anonymous enough in the midst of crushing crowds to just be honest with himself about what he wants out of a wave. Part of this is IMO, a rejection of pro surfing and endless air reverses. A rebellion almost. It won't go far, it will probably die out with the virus. Whatever. I should probably delete this. But screw it.
 

mundus

Duke status
Feb 26, 2018
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I used to be in a position where I could surf good waves entirely alone for weeks. No one else in sight for weeks at a time. The longer I was alone, the more my surfing would change. Waves were plentiful. You start paddling through perfect waves just limping along out on the shoulder because you want the view of the tube and there's another one behind it. And another one behind that one. And something happens to your surfing. As you get more tired, more satiated and lulled into complacency you start leaving your more effort filled "ripping" maneuvers behind. You want to go fast, hit big turns, enjoy that pressure, that flow, let the wave dictate the most efficient path, look for that tube, kick out of the wave on the inside, turn the board towards the outside and stand there feeling the speed bleed off as you look at the oncoming empty waves.

And at the time, the above is SO not what I was into. In a crowded aggressive pack of good surfers I would more than rise to the occasion. But net net, during those periods of isolation I developed this theory. We all have the fantasy of being alone on a desert island with a few boards and endless perfect/empty surf. My theory was that eventually your surfing would change. It would be less about "performance" and more about finding the speed and flow with as little effort as possible. Surfing without an audience changed your surfing. And how fvcked up is that really?

I'm not sure where I was going with all that. I was going to relate the above to midsize surfing and the modern surfer feeling anonymous enough in the midst of crushing crowds to just be honest with himself about what he wants out of a wave. Part of this is IMO, a rejection of pro surfing and endless air reverses. A rebellion almost. It won't go far, it will probably die out with the virus. Whatever. I should probably delete this. But screw it.
Well said, how would the rippers surf if they knew nobody was watching?
 

chilly1

Nep status
Jan 4, 2010
553
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Ripping equals vertical surfing. You cant go straight up vertical on a mid length single fin. Mid Lengths are for cruising not ripping and thats ok. For me, for now mid length is about catching more waves in crowded lineups and or enjoying a different style of surfing. If you want a more vertical approach on a longer "mid length" you are going to want a design with 2 or more fins, but even Toryn and Rasta while being incredible surfers especially on longer craft aren't traditionally ripping
 

Maz

Michael Peterson status
May 18, 2004
2,390
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Innzid
Here's another one: Chilli Mid Strength.

The dark haired guy is Ronnie Blakey, and he rips on that thing - I reckon.

 
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Lowqi2

OTF status
Mar 17, 2013
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I used to be in a position where I could surf good waves entirely alone for weeks. No one else in sight for weeks at a time. The longer I was alone, the more my surfing would change. Waves were plentiful. You start paddling through perfect waves just limping along out on the shoulder because you want the view of the tube and there's another one behind it. And another one behind that one. And something happens to your surfing. As you get more tired, more satiated and lulled into complacency you start leaving your more effort filled "ripping" maneuvers behind. You want to go fast, hit big turns, enjoy that pressure, that flow, let the wave dictate the most efficient path, look for that tube, kick out of the wave on the inside, turn the board towards the outside and stand there feeling the speed bleed off as you look at the oncoming empty waves.

And at the time, the above is SO not what I was into. In a crowded aggressive pack of good surfers I would more than rise to the occasion. But net net, during those periods of isolation I developed this theory. We all have the fantasy of being alone on a desert island with a few boards and endless perfect/empty surf. My theory was that eventually your surfing would change. It would be less about "performance" and more about finding the speed and flow with as little effort as possible. Surfing without an audience changed your surfing. And how fvcked up is that really?

I'm not sure where I was going with all that. I was going to relate the above to midsize surfing and the modern surfer feeling anonymous enough in the midst of crushing crowds to just be honest with himself about what he wants out of a wave. Part of this is IMO, a rejection of pro surfing and endless air reverses. A rebellion almost. It won't go far, it will probably die out with the virus. Whatever. I should probably delete this. But screw it.
Pretty cool you were able to have that surreal experience of just you and perfect waves. Just curious, did you give yourself a score after every soulful waves?:p
 

Retropete

Miki Dora status
Jan 20, 2006
5,026
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Sunny Coast Qld Australia
I would never consider a bonzer of any shape or size to be a mid length.

Im not even really willing to accept anything with side bites to be a mid.

In my mind mid length is a shape, round nose, thick, flat/very slight bottom contours (usually a belly), soft rails, single fin.

the size of it is less important.

Fun shape is a 7 to 8 1/2 foot round nose multi fin board.
95% of the guys I see on a high performance shortboard can’t even put the board vertical. They like to think they can
As Terry Fitzgerald said, "For most surfers it 2 turns and a wipe out to get them through the week."
 

bluemarlin04

Michael Peterson status
Aug 13, 2015
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As Terry Fitzgerald said, "For most surfers it 2 turns and a wipe out to get them through the week."
That’s the funniest thing of it all.

I see these middle age guys all over San Diego and Hawaii on shortboards getting all Aggro and they can barely stand up and pump down the wave but in their own mind they think they’re pros.
 

rgruber

Michael Peterson status
May 30, 2004
3,451
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Been riding a 7'0 midlength lately quite a bit lately and it's more about a different approach than wanting to "rip". You look more toward flowing with the wave and drawing clean lines. When it gets a little bigger or more critical where the 7'0 doesn't really fit, I go and grab my shortboard. But I notice the more I ride it, the less I really like watching super aggressive shortboarders. Just looks a little violent and over wrought to me. I still like watching a good flowy shortboarder but the average pump down the line and look for a quick hit or an air or whatever just looks kinda ugly to me.

I guess it's more about finding the board that lets you surf the way you want to and if you want to be more aggressive, a mid length probably isn't the right vehicle.

That said, I'm anxious to try a twin Torren Martyn sort of board and come down a notch in size to fit a little tighter curved wave and see how that feels.

Anyone ridden one of the Surf Prescription Tur Twins?

On the opposite end of the spectrum, I find I rarely want to grab my longboard anymore.
 

Billy Ocean

Duke status
Jan 7, 2017
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I’m curious about single fin boards in the 6’3 to 6’8 zone

I think a lot of the Wilderness surfboards era boards were in that range

Probably died off for a reason but interesting nonetheless