Ideal age to perish from this earth.

crustBrother

Kelly Slater status
Apr 23, 2001
9,536
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Time seems to slip away much faster and we get closer to the end.
exponentially faster, right?

i remember when i was in the single digit years of my life a single day was good long time. the week before christmas seemed like it would NEVER pass. hell, even an hour could stretch unfathomably long if i was waiting for my parents to get back from parent/teacher conferences :roflmao: summer vacation was a glorious eternity.

now the years just fly by. like where did the last decade go?! i guess i blinked? :roflmao:

in terms of how we experience the flow of time, i really wonder where the halfway point of life was. age 15? and here i am at 56. if i manage to make it to 66, what will that feel like in terms of the passage of time? tomorrow morning? :roflmao:
 
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santacruzin

Kelly Slater status
Oct 17, 2007
9,691
11,665
113
valley purgatory
80 maybe 85 and I am done.
On my wife's side her mother has many health issues along with dementia and her father's life has become a pretty miserable routine of visiting the nursing home and dealing with insurance companies, dr's offices and nursing home bills while not taking care of himself.

I think the difference comes from keeping active. You could never nail my parents down. Always on the go and busy. At 80 they lived like they were 50. My inaws on the other hand at 50 lived like they were 80. Stay young, don't buy rocking chairs.
sadly with dementia this is not the case. Its a crapshoot. It may also come down to genetics. My dad is dealing with it and his mom had it too. Scary for me to think about.

I may ask to be euthanized if that happens to me....
 
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Swallow Tail

Michael Peterson status
Oct 6, 2017
1,935
3,522
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Your Mom’s House
75. Or maybe 78 if you're really thriving at 75. Nobody thrives at 80. That looks grim.
Despite living very healthy & active lives for 76 years and having a genetic history free from ailments, my Mom just died from a 6 month battle with pancreatic cancer and my Dad has been diagnosed with parkinsons. It seems like at 75 the odds of health problems and no longer being able to live and feel like you used to shoot up. I hope I get to feel youthful right up to my last day, even if it means missing out on decades of watching world events unfold on TV.
Sorry to hear about your mom and your dad. That sucks. Ugh.

My dad and his dad and uncles thrived til 90+ n I’m not even exaggerating. Everyone is different. Nothing is guaranteed, nothing is fair, life’s a struggle and beautiful all at the same time. Hug your loved ones and make the most of today, every single day.
 

hammies

Duke status
Apr 8, 2006
15,962
14,882
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Seems like a lot of vigorous, active people really start to slow down after about 75. Yeah, people still go for walks or runs or bike rides and stuff but very, very few people surf or ski or backpack.
 

sponge

Tom Curren status
Feb 10, 2002
13,504
11,648
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Honolulu, HI, USA
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...i remember when i was in the single digit years of my life a single day was good long time. the week before christmas seemed like it would NEVER pass. hell, even an hour could stretch unfathomably long if i was waiting for my parents to get back from parent/teacher conferences :roflmao: summer vacation was a glorious eternity...

Surfing related because he also talks about being in the moment, aka flow. That's probably the reason why time seems to slow down in the barrel.
 

Mr Doof

Duke status
Jan 23, 2002
25,194
8,255
113
San Francisco, CA
When I become a burden on anyone, that is when I hope I check out...

This it what dear old mom always used to say.

Then she lost her ability to have much say about things.

But by then, we all knew what she wanted and had the legal papers that "allowed" us to do what she wanted without facing legal consequences.

As such, can recommend putting these sorts of wishes on paper and registering them with health care professionals, assigning Medical/Financial POA, etc, while you are still of sound mind/body.


Anna N. Smiths story, mainly from the legal wrangling point of view is here (click me) .

Excerpt:

Smith said Marshall spent about $1,000 on her the first night they met. The next day, he invited her to meet him in a hotel room for lunch. After that, she testified, he gave her an envelope filled with cash and told her she didn't have to dance in the club again. Marshall was smitten with her, spending, she said, $1.7 million on her in 1992 (about $3.8 million in today's dollars), including reportedly paying for another breast enhancement surgery. He even put her on the Marshall Petroleum payroll as a consultant—a rumor that sounded preposterous but was substantiated when Smith reported it as income on legal documents years later.

At the same time, Smith's modeling career was heating up. She had sent photos of herself to Playboy magazine and caught the eye of Hugh Hefner. She made the magazine cover in 1992 and was named Playmate of the Year in 1993. Her reward? A Jaguar convertible, $100,000, and a 10-page spread in the June 1993 issue.
Smith eventually divorced her first husband, paving the way for her to marry then 89-year-old Marshall in 1994. Smith was just 26 years old. She wore a 22-carat diamond—reportedly worth $107,000—to the Houston drive-in wedding chapel ceremony. Marshall was wheeled up the aisle behind her.

The marriage only lasted about 13 months. Marshall died in 1995 at the age of 90. His estate was worth $1.6 billion at the time—about $3.2 billion in today's dollars.
 
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ElOgro

Duke status
Dec 3, 2010
32,946
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This it what dear old mom always used to say.

Then she lost her ability to have much say about things.

But by then, we all knew what she wanted and had the legal papers that "allowed" us to do what she wanted without facing legal consequences.

As such, can recommend putting these sorts of wishes on paper and registering them with health care professionals, assigning Medical/Financial POA, etc, while you are still of sound mind/body.
Too late for me, on both counts. :drowning:
 
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Reactions: Mr Doof
Jan 17, 2007
35
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72
Oxnard
Seems like a lot of vigorous, active people really start to slow down after about 75. Yeah, people still go for walks or runs or bike rides and stuff but very, very few people surf or ski or backpack.
72 in May. Surfed the other day and pop up problems are rearing their ugly head. Still no problems snowboarding. No quick popups necessary. Bit slower doing almost everything. Bike riding hasn't changed much. Better equipment.
 

Maz

Michael Peterson status
May 18, 2004
3,243
4,951
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Innzid
My Mom just turned 95. She gets around fine without assistance, goes on daily walks and has all her marbles. Really quite amazing.
My wife's grandmother died on the night of her 95th. The whole family was there to celebrate her birthday, she was truly the glue of the family. The matriarch.
Sharp as a tack; volunteered at the local old age home; took her dogs for 1hr walks every day; made great salads from her own garden.
 

Kento

Duke status
Jan 11, 2002
69,847
22,861
113
The Bar
Not for awhile hopefully. Not just living but I want to be spry for as long as I can be at that point. Keeping active is key IMO.

This book had some good insights:

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You have to read between the lines in places but it is clear that cutting women's arms off and titfucking them is one way to increase your longevity. I expect Eunice to be immortal.
 

Matilija

Gerry Lopez status
Oct 27, 2010
1,163
387
83
Whenever Im at mammoth and end up on a chair with a septuagenarian or octogenarian I always ask them the same question… “whats’s your secret?” and pretty much always get the same answer…”don’t stop”. Same thing backpacking, always surprised how many older people I see still getting after it. I plan to be one of them. As long as luck doesn’t deal me a sh!t hand health wise. You never know if you’re gonna be the cancer, aneurism, or some other bullshit disease guy. Until then it’s full court press.
 

Random Guy

Duke status
Jan 16, 2002
32,572
6,863
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I have considered it, and no, I don’t have an age that’s the right age
id like to live a long life and die young, like my mother did, healthy and living her best life until her sudden death at 84
and the opposite of my father who had a stroke at 47 that “should’ve” killed him, but didnt
the next one at 50 did, and there was much rejoicing

theres no optimal age to die
 
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