How’s the stock market?

Autoprax

Duke status
Jan 24, 2011
69,371
23,899
113
62
Vagina Point
I love my dentist. she is a major asshole, but dentistry seems inherently masochistic

you need a good dentist, barber, and mechanic

once you get that nailed, life is grand
I had an okay dentist (she was super good looking) but I loved her office manager.

They both retired.

Women!

IT must be nice to quit working.

I think the husband gets tired of the wife complaining about work and says "Go ahead and quit if it will shut you up."

This is the case with tons of women teachers at Cal State.

20 years and you are toast
 

Mr Doof

Duke status
Jan 23, 2002
25,115
8,146
113
San Francisco, CA
has anyone here broken up with their money person before?
Yes. Helped/encouraged Sweetie-pie to break up with her 'wealth management team' who were little more than an easy(ier) to reach boutique firm out of Silicon Valley that more or less encouraged her to buy in/out of riskier financial vehicles (that in turn were just mutual funds/ETFs created by third parties). Essentially she was getting dinged by mngt fees from them and by the underlying third party (like T.Rowe Price.Vanguard/etc), and I have strong doubts about their whole 'hands on style', which I thought couldn't be free either. This had all been set up up by previous wealthy boyfriend's family and am sure it served the collected "their" interests before hers.



....and can give some insight in to how break ups are perceived from the other side?
As a semi-family run thing, they were unhappy and kept wanting to know why she was leaving. During some discussion she had, it was only then that they said they'd stop taking a cut of transfer fees (from one fund to another or transferring back to her bank account) if she'd stay. I had been bummed to learned that this had been happening all along and was one of my bigger things to point out why she should get rid of them ASAP.

....morgan stanley IRA is woefully underperforming Vanguard the last few years so I'm going to roll the majority stake in to my current employer-provided account
Sweetie-pie now has everything in Vanguard. They have a semi-managed S&P 500 fund that did slightly better (even taking into account fees) that their passive version for the last few years....if I am remembering right. But this would be well worth your time double/triple checking. Don't all these bigger financial groups have similar cheap index funds/ETFs as Vanguard by now?

PS
Broke up with a dentist once. She bad-mouthed me to a friend who still went to them. My reason for leaving: too much of the 'hard-sell' personality type. Current dentist used to surf before moving to SF. Grew up in Del Mar. He likes to hear of me surfing in winter at the Beach.

Edit for below:
Source

(am linking only to show another opinion...and who know this person probably has an angle too)
1716315922473.png
 
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john4surf

Kelly Slater status
May 28, 2005
9,165
4,161
113
CBS, CA
has anyone here broken up with their money person before?

is anyone here a money person and can give some insight in to how break ups are perceived from the other side?

morgan stanley IRA is woefully underperforming Vanguard the last few years so I'm going to roll the majority stake in to my current employer-provided account
Good move if your employer has some kind of match to your savings. If not, Vanguard has been our ‘go to’ since the 70s, we’ve always be ahead when cashing out. You’re likely too young right now to benefit from the “catch up” option that the gov’t allows investors over 55 or maybe it’s 65 to invest in IRAs up to $7,500 a year (I forget as its been years since my wife added $7,500 to our IRAs which have an amount ceiling). This gives families (that can afford it) an opportunity to ‘catch up’ when they couldn't afford perhaps to invest the max annually when the IRA investor was younger, raising a family, expenses, pay check to pay check etc.
 
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Chocki

Phil Edwards status
Feb 18, 2007
7,168
8,067
113
Planet Earth
Good move if your employer has some kind of match to your savings. If not, Vanguard has been our ‘go to’ since the 70s, we’ve always be ahead when cashing out. You’re likely too young right now to benefit from the “catch up” option that the gov’t allows investors over 55 or maybe it’s 65 to invest in IRAs up to $7,500 a year (I forget as its been years since my wife added $7,500 to our IRAs which have an amount ceiling). This gives families (that can afford it) an opportunity to ‘catch up’ when they couldn't afford perhaps to invest the max annually when the IRA investor was younger, raising a family, expenses, pay check to pay check etc.
Vanguard is dank
 

sussle

Rabbitt Bartholomew status
Oct 11, 2009
8,486
7,915
113
Good move if your employer has some kind of match to your savings. If not, Vanguard has been our ‘go to’ since the 70s, we’ve always be ahead when cashing out. You’re likely too young right now to benefit from the “catch up” option that the gov’t allows investors over 55 or maybe it’s 65 to invest in IRAs up to $7,500 a year (I forget as its been years since my wife added $7,500 to our IRAs which have an amount ceiling). This gives families (that can afford it) an opportunity to ‘catch up’ when they couldn't afford perhaps to invest the max annually when the IRA investor was younger, raising a family, expenses, pay check to pay check etc.
Good advice, homie :waving: if nothing else, always always get the employer max match, even if it hurts to do it. It's stone free money.

20 some years ago, in mid-divorce from the first Mrs Sussle, I somehow concluded that I couldn't afford to contribute to my 401k at that point in time, and ceased contributions for a year or two. Which meant I lost the 6% employer match as well from that time. And I can look back now and see that by doing so, with the employer match and index fund growth, I basically left tens of thousands of $'s on the table. I should have toughed it out and kept contributing. :poke:
 

sussle

Rabbitt Bartholomew status
Oct 11, 2009
8,486
7,915
113
good enough :cheers: expect share price will top $1k tomorrow
Nvidia (NVDA) reported its fiscal first quarter earnings after the bell on Wednesday, beating Wall Street’s expectations on both the top and bottom line and announcing a 10-for-1 stock split set to take effect June 7.
The company saw adjusted earnings per share (EPS) for the quarter of $6.12 on revenue of $26 billion, a jump of 461% and 261%, respectively, from a year ago.
Analysts were expecting Adj. EPS of $5.65 on revenue of $24.69 billion, according to data from Bloomberg. The company reported adjusted EPS of $1.09 on revenue of $7.19 billion in the same quarter last year.
In the current quarter, Nvidia expects revenue of $28 billion plus or minus 2% in the coming quarter. That’s better analysts had expected.
Nvidia stock rose as much as 4% in extended trading on Wednesday.
 

sussle

Rabbitt Bartholomew status
Oct 11, 2009
8,486
7,915
113
Not surprising. Tesla did same thing when they got so high, few people could afford a single share.

Tesla had a 5-for-1 stock split in mid-2020 and a 3-for-1 split in mid-2022
on paper, the math is a wash....but the split makes NVDA a lot more affordable for retail investors. i'm thinking that brings fresh meat into marketplace - people buying NVDA @$100 when they would pass on NVDA @$1000. i'd probably add some more shares myself at this price coz apparently the data indicates splits are not just a numbers game:

Data from Bank of America cited by TKer showed the average 12-month return for any stock after a split is 25.4%, more than double the average annual return for the overall market.
 
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