Heavy Suitcase Deadlifts Build Anti-Rotational Control And Strength

Chocki

Michael Peterson status
Feb 18, 2007
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Oh wait it’s posted on Breaking Muscle so it can’t be legit.

But then I looked at the author’s creds and they’re totally legit:
“Jesse Irizarry is a former Division 1 strength and conditioning coach. He worked as the head strength coach for three conference-champion teams for multiple years. Jesse was also an assistant strength and conditioning coach to the Liberty University Football team during multiple Division 1 FCS conference championships.

Since leaving college strength and conditioning and moving to the private sector, Jesse has created and developed multiple competitive strength programs and clubs for both Olympic weightlifting and powerlifting in New York City.

He is the owner and head coach at JDI Barbell, one of New York City's only dedicated strength facilities specializing in Olympic weightlifting, powerlifting, and general strength and conditioning.”

Cue VM chiming in with his worthless opinions about how anti-rotation, muscle imbalances, etc. are myths etc in 3, 2, 1 ...
(Unless he’s too busy jacking it to pics of Dr. Juicy J, in which case the inevitable reply might take a day or so.)
 

VonMeister

Duke status
Apr 26, 2013
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JOE BIDENS RAPE FINGER
You have no idea why you read....and then posted an opinion about it.:roflmao::roflmao::roflmao:

Your silly bioscience aside.....

The main role of a coach is to position a person for training success and develop a program that will help them reach max potential and max adherence. Never does the first bite of the apple wind up with perfect results...or even adequate results for any lasting period of time. As adaption to programming occurs likely changes will need to be made to continue adaption and strength or physical improvements. For instance a completely untrained novice will be much more sensitive to training stress than a intermediate or advance lifter. (This is why the silly garbage you find on YouTube works for you) Ideally, a coach and individual will come up with program that meets the physical goals of the trainee and the mental goals necessary for adherence.

In other words, instead of trying to fit an individual into a particular plan or throw random garbage at the wall to see what sticks, we should try to fit the plan to a particular individual.

How do you do this on YouTube via social media influencers?:roflmao::roflmao::roflmao::roflmao:
 

$kully

Duke status
Feb 27, 2009
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You have no idea why you read....and then posted an opinion about it.:roflmao::roflmao::roflmao:

Your silly bioscience aside.....

The main role of a coach is to position a person for training success and develop a program that will help them reach max potential and max adherence. Never does the first bite of the apple wind up with perfect results...or even adequate results for any lasting period of time. As adaption to programming occurs likely changes will need to be made to continue adaption and strength or physical improvements. For instance a completely untrained novice will be much more sensitive to training stress than a intermediate or advance lifter. (This is why the silly garbage you find on YouTube works for you) Ideally, a coach and individual will come up with program that meets the physical goals of the trainee and the mental goals necessary for adherence.

In other words, instead of trying to fit an individual into a particular plan or throw random garbage at the wall to see what sticks, we should try to fit the plan to a particular individual.

How do you do this on YouTube via social media influencers?:roflmao::roflmao::roflmao::roflmao:

The political forum misses you Doug.
 

PRCD

Phil Edwards status
Feb 25, 2020
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You have no idea why you read....and then posted an opinion about it.:roflmao::roflmao::roflmao:

Your silly bioscience aside.....

The main role of a coach is to position a person for training success and develop a program that will help them reach max potential and max adherence. Never does the first bite of the apple wind up with perfect results...or even adequate results for any lasting period of time. As adaption to programming occurs likely changes will need to be made to continue adaption and strength or physical improvements. For instance a completely untrained novice will be much more sensitive to training stress than a intermediate or advance lifter. (This is why the silly garbage you find on YouTube works for you) Ideally, a coach and individual will come up with program that meets the physical goals of the trainee and the mental goals necessary for adherence.

In other words, instead of trying to fit an individual into a particular plan or throw random garbage at the wall to see what sticks, we should try to fit the plan to a particular individual.

How do you do this on YouTube via social media influencers?:roflmao::roflmao::roflmao::roflmao:
I am in complete agreement, however, how does a novice identify a good coach beforehand? There are tons of charlatans in the industry. A novice, by definition, knows nothing, so how does he tell a good coach apart from a bad one? Where does he go to find one? People like me buy books like PP, but this is inadequate because it takes an experienced coach to know how to apply the knowledge therein. Most of the books, consequently, are geared towards the novice for whom everything works. Trial and error is somewhat successful at an intermediate level, even if it's inefficient.

I think you could've made your point better without the :roflmao:

Somebody is having drama withdrawals.

Would it help if I sent you some death threats and maybe started stalking you?

I'm worried about you.
I have a bunch of people on ignore and have never responded to anything they've written. Occasionally, I look at ignored posts and they're responding to something I said. Somehow I'm living rent-free in their head. Maybe talking to someone who never responds is better than dealing with their own thoughts on their own or talking to a wall.
 
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VonMeister

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I am in complete agreement, however, how does a novice identify a good coach beforehand? There are tons of charlatans in the industry. A novice, by definition, knows nothing, so how does he tell a good coach apart from a bad one? Where does he go to find one? People like me buy books like PP, but this is inadequate because it takes an experienced coach to know how to apply the knowledge therein. Most of the books, consequently, are geared towards the novice for whom everything works. Trial and error is somewhat successful at an intermediate level, even if it's inefficient.

I think you could've made your point better without the :roflmao:


I have a bunch of people on ignore and have never responded to anything they've written. Occasionally, I look at ignored posts and they're responding to something I said. Somehow I'm living rent-free in their head. Maybe talking to someone who never responds is better than dealing with their own thoughts on their own or talking to a wall.
Beforehand is tough..word of mouth is a good start. It's easy to judge a strength and conditioning coach once underway. If you didn't participate in the initial programming....bad coach. If you're bored, over fatigued, grinding out reps and sets, bad coach, most importantly if you aren't getting the results you discussed during the initial programming phase and the adjustments aren't made or don't work after 3 to 4 weeks, bad coach. if your coach uses anaerobic exercises like kettlebells as the main strength building work, bad coach. Also if your coach mentions the phrase "activate" or "muscle imbalance", bad coach.
 
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PRCD

Phil Edwards status
Feb 25, 2020
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Beforehand is tough..word of mouth is a good start. It's easy to judge a strength and conditioning coach once underway. If you didn't participate in the initial programming....bad coach. If you're bored, over fatigued, grinding out reps and sets, bad coach, most importantly if you aren't getting the results you discussed during the initial programming phase and the adjustments aren't made or don't work after 3 to 4 weeks, bad coach. if your coach uses anaerobic exercises like kettlebells as the main strength building work, bad coach. Also if your coach mentions the phrase "activate" or "muscle imbalance", bad coach.
Sounds like someone needs to write a short book or pamphlet on how to pick a good coach.

My problems at the intermediate level programming for myself were boredom and grinding out reps and sets. Eventually progress stopped. I was a bad coach of myself.
 

VonMeister

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Apr 26, 2013
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Sounds like someone needs to write a short book or pamphlet on how to pick a good coach.

My problems at the intermediate level programming for myself were boredom and grinding out reps and sets. Eventually progress stopped. I was a bad coach of myself.
Right now I'm dialing the intensity way down and the stress up.

On the main lifts, instead of a heavy single at RPE 8 (92% intensity), followed by a back off set of 4 at RPE 8 (84% Intensity), followed by 4 sets of 4 at RPE 7 (78% intensity).....

Im doing:

Triple at RPE 7. (The triple keeps the overall intensity down even if you overshot on the last rep and call it an 8 or 9 because the fatigue of the first two reps factored into the increased intensity.) Followed by 5 sets of 5 between 65-70% intensity which is around an RPE 6.

The overall weight lifted is higher but the intensity is lower. I'm still getting stress but without the metal or physical grind of the higher intensity work and the resulting fatigue. All reps are high quality where high intensity reps have been shown to be somewhat less useful for applying stress and subsequent strength development...not to mention chance of injury reduction and lighter mental preparation required.

All accessory work is 5x5 at RPE 6 to 6.5.

Another easier method would be a single at RPE 8, 5x5 backoff sets at 25% less...make adjustments as needed.

In order to lift a heavy single you need to train heavy singles....but that's not my goal. I'm going to run this for 3 to 4 weeks and see if an adjustment is needed...and maybe after 8 weeks do a week or 2 of higher intensity work and then check and see if I PR any lifts. At 53 this is sort of my last run at being my own test mule for raw strength development.
 
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Chocki

Michael Peterson status
Feb 18, 2007
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I am in complete agreement, however, how does a novice identify a good coach beforehand? There are tons of charlatans in the industry. A novice, by definition, knows nothing, so how does he tell a good coach apart from a bad one? Where does he go to find one? People like me buy books like PP, but this is inadequate because it takes an experienced coach to know how to apply the knowledge therein. Most of the books, consequently, are geared towards the novice for whom everything works. Trial and error is somewhat successful at an intermediate level, even if it's inefficient.

I think you could've made your point better without the :roflmao:


I have a bunch of people on ignore and have never responded to anything they've written. Occasionally, I look at ignored posts and they're responding to something I said. Somehow I'm living rent-free in their head. Maybe talking to someone who never responds is better than dealing with their own thoughts on their own or talking to a wall.
The easiest way to find a good Coach is to go with an NSCA Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist or someone like Max Shank both of which I’m pretty sure VM is the only person in the world questioning their credibility. As a former CSCS myself I’m still waiting to hear what VM qualifications are.

They’ll do a needs assessment to determine your goals and develop a program to specifically address them. If they’re really good they’ll pick the funnest, simplest tools available that pretty much guarantee your not going to get hurt using them while also just about guaranteeing results (loaded carries). Everything they have you do should have a specific reason behind it along with the overall goal of improving your athleticism.

It should look very similar to this:
Here’s what Mark Reifkind has to say about Max’s UA book
“I've been training, competing and coaching for the last 43 years and I've seen a LOT of great athletes. Max is one of the best I've ever seen.He pretty much can do it all; he's as strong as a powerlifter, mobile and coordinated as a gymnast, powerful as an olympic lifter and as supple as a yogi.He's competed and won in Muay Thai, BJJ, Highland Games, got a pro soccer contract at 17, and can do whatever he wants to with his body.

And yet what he can do that must elite athletes like him cannot is TEACH. Max is as creative and disciplined a thinker and teacher as he is an athlete.
His new book, Ultimate Athleticism is the distillation of Max's experience, thought and study of the human body, movement and training for the last 20 years.It's not a fancy book. On first blush it almost appears too simple. Until you get into the guts of it and realize just how thoughtful, consistent and organized his program is.

His progressions guide you step by step to these very basic but very big movements..And while the core of it are his four basic movements it is rife with accessory and assistance exercises to guide you to these moves that make up the heart of the program.

Four basic moves that cover bodyweight strength and mobility, barbell strength and power and the upper and lower body. and everything in between.
One could work on just these four moves and accessory work for a lifetime and be as fit and mobile as could be.

And the writing is pure Max, just as if you were talking to him in person. Or having him coach you.

Max is one of those rare teachers and coaches that can make the complex simple in just a few words.

This is a book not just to be read but to be studied.
Well done Max, well done.”

Just to refresh your memory VM, this is what actual athleticism looks like:

 
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