Hawaii- Done

bluemarlin04

Michael Peterson status
Aug 13, 2015
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Can eat them. But I always worry about cig with papio and ulua.

I think you can just get the cig test kit though.
 

oneula

Miki Dora status
Jun 3, 2004
4,252
2,397
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As a keiki in the 60's-70's our families would lay net and paipai net all weekend for awa and mullet.
That's how we fed the families (awa poke) that came down to spend the weekend together. About a half a dozen intertwined calabash families.
Allot of time we'd catch palani and weke when we'd paipai which was scary with their tail razers.
Everyone treated the palani with their dark leather skin to be garbage fish. The running joke from the adults was that the way to cook palani was to cut slits in the skin and then rub dog sht into the slits and all over the fish. After leaving it on the barbeque for hours you'd scrape off the dog sht, throw away the fish and eat the dog sht which would taste better than the fish.

In reality we would have a keawe wood 50 gal drum hibachi going all day along the beach front and we'd climb up on the roof of our dive hut and get some dried menpachi to cook and eat for ourselves but throw on a couple palani and let it cook all day and rip it open. We'd leave a bunch of hashie around and all the bruddahs coming in from a surf could just sit by the fire and snack as much as they wanted for free. Every kid was family that was taken care of back then. Papio and ulua were treated with respect compared to the palani and sharks we caught. Day's gone for sure. Now there's million dollar Ocean Point homes sitting 30 feet above and overlooking where we grew up like that on the beach front.
 

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Legend (inyourownmind)
Mar 11, 2008
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That lifestyle at a moderate income level is gone for good in Hawaii - it can be enjoyed if one moves to Tonga, Fiji, or the Cook Islands, certainly in the provinces of The Philippines, well-outside the money orbit of the United States dollar.

You will be poor by material standards but you will have a nice lifestyle.

But once the shoebox satellite constellations like Starlink and its competitors are up and running, promising high-speed internet connectivity virtually anywhere on earth, then there will be remote workers in some of the more uncrowded surf locations on this planet, like the southern atolls of Maldives, Fiji Vanua Levu, the Cook Islands, The Philippines, Chilean Patagonia or the Aleutians, surfing as much as possible and doing their coding work far, far away from any office and getting paid well.

That will be the end of the "rural lifestyle" in many areas now untouched by 5G mobile phone signal or gigabit fibre connections :)
 
Last edited:
Apr 1, 2020
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But once the shoebox satellite constellations like Starlink and its competitors are up and running, promising high-speed internet connectivity virtually anywhere on earth, then there will be remote workers in some of the more uncrowded surf locations on this planet, like the southern atolls of Maldives, Fiji Vanua Levu, the Cook Islands, The Philippines, Chilean Patagonia or the Aleutians, surfing as much as possible and doing their coding work far, far away from any office and getting paid well.
You forgot and claiming local status after 3 months :roflmao:
 

bluemarlin04

Michael Peterson status
Aug 13, 2015
2,476
2,266
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That lifestyle at a moderate income level is gone for good in Hawaii - it can be enjoyed if one moves to Tonga, Fiji, or the Cook Islands, certainly in the provinces of The Philippines, well-outside the money orbit of the United States dollar.

You will be poor by material standards but you will have a nice lifestyle.

But once the shoebox satellite constellations like Starlink and its competitors are up and running, promising high-speed internet connectivity virtually anywhere on earth, then there will be remote workers in some of the more uncrowded surf locations on this planet, like the southern atolls of Maldives, Fiji Vanua Levu, the Cook Islands, The Philippines, Chilean Patagonia or the Aleutians, surfing as much as possible and doing their coding work far, far away from any office and getting paid well.

That will be the end of the "rural lifestyle" in many areas now untouched by 5G mobile phone signal or gigabit fibre connections :)
I think starlink having reliable high speed internet in remote areas is still pretty far away.

I used to work SATCOMS in the military. The footprints required for starlink in places like Iran are already there because the orbits of the sattelites are there.

More remote areas like the south pacific will require footprint coverage and new sattelites or leasing time on someone elses (no way that happens).
 

PPK96754

Miki Dora status
Apr 15, 2015
4,367
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Kauai's north shore ~
That lifestyle at a moderate income level is gone for good in Hawaii - it can be enjoyed if one moves to Tonga, Fiji, or the Cook Islands, certainly in the provinces of The Philippines, well-outside the money orbit of the United States dollar.

You will be poor by material standards but you will have a nice lifestyle.

But once the shoebox satellite constellations like Starlink and its competitors are up and running, promising high-speed internet connectivity virtually anywhere on earth, then there will be remote workers in some of the more uncrowded surf locations on this planet, like the southern atolls of Maldives, Fiji Vanua Levu, the Cook Islands, The Philippines, Chilean Patagonia or the Aleutians, surfing as much as possible and doing their coding work far, far away from any office and getting paid well.

That will be the end of the "rural lifestyle" in many areas now untouched by 5G mobile phone signal or gigabit fibre connections :)
Loved living in the Cook Islands in the 1980's yet, fresh meat had to be shipped in either from New Zealand or from Aussie and the locals then, got food from the "tinnie's" or can goods. Everything went into Avarua harbor on the main island of Rarotonga and then shipped to the outer islands on a smaller container ship. Pacific Islanders are a pretty resourceful people yet, continue to rely on modern, today products.
To be a "remote worker" in any of the above named places, I don't know. To me, it would take $$$ to buy all of the necessities to live that lifestyle. Perhaps there's already a livable structure there, solar power or generator? Fuel for the generator? Drive to "town?" Buy a truck there or bring one? StarLink and all that goes with it .... shipped in? Set up costs? Quite the project with enough cash I suppose. It's a dream for all of us yet only attainable for few. Oh yeah, I forgot about cyclones & tsunamis. Always a possibility.

My choice? Aitutaki, it's lagoon and motu's. Had a shot at being the bar manager there after working at the Rarotonga Resort Hotel. Air New Zealand and the New Zealand government was going in to rebuild the small resort and air field. It never happened.
Living the dream in my head .... didn't cost me a dime. ;)
 

sussle

Phil Edwards status
Oct 11, 2009
6,267
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Loved living in the Cook Islands in the 1980's yet, fresh meat had to be shipped in either from New Zealand or from Aussie and the locals then, got food from the "tinnie's" or can goods. Everything went into Avarua harbor on the main island of Rarotonga and then shipped to the outer islands on a smaller container ship. Pacific Islanders are a pretty resourceful people yet, continue to rely on modern, today products.
To be a "remote worker" in any of the above named places, I don't know. To me, it would take $$$ to buy all of the necessities to live that lifestyle. Perhaps there's already a livable structure there, solar power or generator? Fuel for the generator? Drive to "town?" Buy a truck there or bring one? StarLink and all that goes with it .... shipped in? Set up costs? Quite the project with enough cash I suppose. It's a dream for all of us yet only attainable for few. Oh yeah, I forgot about cyclones & tsunamis. Always a possibility.

My choice? Aitutaki, it's lagoon and motu's. Had a shot at being the bar manager there after working at the Rarotonga Resort Hotel. Air New Zealand and the New Zealand government was going in to rebuild the small resort and air field. It never happened.
Living the dream in my head .... didn't cost me a dime. ;)
been reading quite a bit about that life and the South Pacific lately....started with Michener (Tales Of The South Pacific), but gravitated to the non-fiction stuff like An Island To One's Self, which led me to Robert Dean Frisbie's tales of Puka-Puka and Suwarrow. the romantic attraction is powerful, the reality no doubt very different.
 

JSC

Legend (inyourownmind)
Mar 11, 2008
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Yeah starlink isn’t gonna cover broke Oceania countries for awhile
Governments don't pay for a Starlink type system - subscribers do.

If you are important enough to the company that they will pay you to work your magick coding sklills from the location of your choice with good waves and no crowds, they will pay for the terminal and the subscription fee.

"Starlink provides satellite internet connectivity to underserved areas of the planet, as well as competitively priced service in more urbanized areas"

The great thing about the system is governments can't cut it or block it - hence the request from Ukraine for 100 Starlink terminals, delivered as soon as possible.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Starlink

But yes - more remote areas will be covered later than more densely populated ones as there are fewer potential subscribers - so it will be awhile before the Starlink system or a competitive constellation is available in remote places like the Aleutians, the Nicobar Islands or most of the south Pacific.
 
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SurfFuerteventura

Phil Edwards status
Sep 20, 2014
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hulling, mostly...
Governments don't pay for a Starlink type system - subscribers do.

If you are important enough to the company that they will pay you to work your magick coding sklills from the location of your choice with good waves and no crowds, they will pay for the terminal and the subscription fee.

"Starlink provides satellite internet connectivity to underserved areas of the planet, as well as competitively priced service in more urbanized areas"

The great thing about the system is governments can't cut it or block it - hence the request from Ukraine for 100 Starlink terminals, delivered as soon as possible.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Starlink

But yes - more remote areas will be covered later than more densely populated ones as there are fewer potential subscribers - so it will be awhile before the Starlink system or a competitive constellation is available in remote places like the Aleutians, the Nicobar Islands or most of the south Pacific.
2023 for us out here.... can't wait to send the Spanish Telefonica monopoly to go "Freir Patatas" as soon as they launch.

70 bucks a month sure beats 200!!!!

Thanks! Didn't even know about this... the erBB provides.

:shaka::bowdown::shaka:
 
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bluemarlin04

Michael Peterson status
Aug 13, 2015
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Governments don't pay for a Starlink type system - subscribers do.

If you are important enough to the company that they will pay you to work your magick coding sklills from the location of your choice with good waves and no crowds, they will pay for the terminal and the subscription fee.

"Starlink provides satellite internet connectivity to underserved areas of the planet, as well as competitively priced service in more urbanized areas"

The great thing about the system is governments can't cut it or block it - hence the request from Ukraine for 100 Starlink terminals, delivered as soon as possible.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Starlink

But yes - more remote areas will be covered later than more densely populated ones as there are fewer potential subscribers - so it will be awhile before the Starlink system or a competitive constellation is available in remote places like the Aleutians, the Nicobar Islands or most of the south Pacific.
One thing about remote work (I am a remote worker).

99.9 percent of companies (and I want to say 100 but there is likely anomalie) require remote workers to be able to fly in fairly regularly or easily. While you may be truly remote- you’ll have to travel sometimes. Even if 1-2 times per year- being that remote is prob a no go for most employers
 

PPK96754

Miki Dora status
Apr 15, 2015
4,367
4,966
113
76
Kauai's north shore ~
Last edited:

Autoprax

Duke status
Jan 24, 2011
59,049
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Vagina Point
Loved living in the Cook Islands in the 1980's yet, fresh meat had to be shipped in either from New Zealand or from Aussie and the locals then, got food from the "tinnie's" or can goods. Everything went into Avarua harbor on the main island of Rarotonga and then shipped to the outer islands on a smaller container ship. Pacific Islanders are a pretty resourceful people yet, continue to rely on modern, today products.
To be a "remote worker" in any of the above named places, I don't know. To me, it would take $$$ to buy all of the necessities to live that lifestyle. Perhaps there's already a livable structure there, solar power or generator? Fuel for the generator? Drive to "town?" Buy a truck there or bring one? StarLink and all that goes with it .... shipped in? Set up costs? Quite the project with enough cash I suppose. It's a dream for all of us yet only attainable for few. Oh yeah, I forgot about cyclones & tsunamis. Always a possibility.

My choice? Aitutaki, it's lagoon and motu's. Had a shot at being the bar manager there after working at the Rarotonga Resort Hotel. Air New Zealand and the New Zealand government was going in to rebuild the small resort and air field. It never happened.
Living the dream in my head .... didn't cost me a dime. ;)
Peter, have you read Trustee from the Tool Room?

Great book about that part of the world.
 

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Legend (inyourownmind)
Mar 11, 2008
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For those interested in expatriate life in the Pacific, "Sex Lives of Cannibals" is a memoir of life in Tarawa in Kiribati - highly realistic and damn funny.

Has surfing content; Tarawa can get good surf, sometimes.

"The Sex Lives of Cannibals tells the hilarious story of what happens when Troost discovers that Tarawa is not the island paradise he dreamed of. Falling into one amusing misadventure after another, Troost struggles through relentless, stifling heat, a variety of deadly bacteria, polluted seas, toxic fish—all in a country where the only music to be heard for miles around is “La Macarena.”

He and his stalwart girlfriend Sylvia spend the next two years battling incompetent government officials, alarmingly large critters, erratic electricity, and a paucity of food options (including the Great Beer Crisis); and contending with a bizarre cast of local characters, including “Half-Dead Fred” and the self-proclaimed Poet Laureate of Tarawa (a British drunkard who’s never written a poem in his life)"

https://www.amazon.com/Sex-Lives-Cannibals-Equatorial-Pacific/dp/0767915305/ref=sr_1_1?crid=3HU192P8BTU6I&keywords=sex+lives+of+cannibals+by+maarten+troost&qid=1665536492&qu=eyJxc2MiOiIyLjExIiwicXNhIjoiMS40MCIsInFzcCI6IjEuNjYifQ==&s=books&sprefix=Sex+lives+of+cannibals,stripbooks-intl-ship,294&sr=1-1
 
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