Hawaii- Done

vanrysss

Billy Hamilton status
Mar 25, 2019
1,664
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from Oregon, now SD
Heard from a friend that baby haleiwa was pretty fun over this past run of swell and only had three or four guys on it. 100yds away fifty guys paddling on top of each other.

NS swells were very under-reported, Friday morning was probably best but Sunday and Monday were fun as well. Only a couple of spots were picking it up so got pretty crowded.
 

racer1

Tom Curren status
Apr 16, 2014
12,982
15,073
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Honolulu, Hawaii
Per the Star Advertiser this morning, Hawaii tax revenues soared to a record high in April. What would be nice is if they explained how "they are counting sales tax and retail sales". I do not understand how they differentiate a retail sale or the tax generated by such as being tourism related. An individual spends $200 at Ala Moana, how do they know if he is a resident or a tourist. Maybe track credit cards, but that would not take into account cash sales. Might be interesting to find the yearly total of sales taxes and divide the figure by the number of residents in Hawaii and come up with a figure.
These figures most likely do not account for the amount of income generated by tips in the service industries. From experience, I know that a large portion of this is not reported as income, but goes into the economy as it is being spent by residents. Tourism related, but really no way account for it.
As for the factoring in of the percentage leaving the Islands due to the non local ownership of hotels, car rentals and airlines, it would be interesting to know that figure. I believe that it is still true that the daily revenues from Costco leaves the State on a daily basis. Is the revenue generated by Costco counted as partially generated by Tourism? On a daily basis, following the arrivals of tourists on Maui, a major first stop for them is Costco and they load up prior to heading to where they are staying. Is that counted as Tourism generated?
I think it's impossible to calculate all that down to the dollar, so what they are doing is multiplying non-resident arrivals by average spend.
 

afoaf

Duke status
Jun 25, 2008
49,930
23,590
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Heard from a friend that baby haleiwa was pretty fun over this past run of swell and only had three or four guys on it. 100yds away fifty guys paddling on top of each other.

NS swells were very under-reported, Friday morning was probably best but Sunday and Monday were fun as well. Only a couple of spots were picking it up so got pretty crowded.
hanalei was breaking a bit while we were there...south side had tons of waves

PPK is king of hawaii

what a week!
 
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youcantbeserious

Billy Hamilton status
Oct 29, 2020
1,567
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Location location
Heard from a friend that baby haleiwa was pretty fun over this past run of swell and only had three or four guys on it. 100yds away fifty guys paddling on top of each other.

NS swells were very under-reported, Friday morning was probably best but Sunday and Monday were fun as well. Only a couple of spots were picking it up so got pretty crowded.
Friday morning was fun at the point, just surfed Big Rights and actually had a great session! A town first!
 

vanrysss

Billy Hamilton status
Mar 25, 2019
1,664
3,754
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from Oregon, now SD
As I recall Andy dropped in on Lucas who returned the favor or may have surfed behind him on the next. Andy reacted in true fashion by going ballistic. Im pretty sure Lucas offered to settle their differences on the beach at one point although I didn't hear that part. Ended with Andy backing down and saying something about drinking beers and playing pool.

One of these guys is in his twenties, the other guy came off as an entitled manchild who can't handle his own medicine.
 
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Waiehu

Legend (inyourownmind)
Apr 1, 2009
350
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I think it's impossible to calculate all that down to the dollar, so what they are doing is multiplying non-resident arrivals by average spend.
I agree that it is impossible to calculate down to the dollar, but how are the coming up with the average spend? Exit polls?
I did find some figures for May of 2021. The State figures give a total of 1.1 billion dollars spent by tourists that month. The total tourist count they give is 629,681 for that month. Just using the 4% GET tax (not figuring in the Hotel tax of 13.25% due to the fact they do not show how many stayed in hotels) that comes up to approximately 44000000. A pretty good contribution to the tax base of Hawaii.
Using the figure that tourism is only 20 percent of the economy of Hawaii, that leaves the remaining 80 percent. It would be nice to know what comprises this eighty percent. The good news is that with tourism contributing 1.1 billion dollars in May 2021, that means the remaining contributions by the eighty percent should have been massive, so no need to worry about our economy and we can afford to reduce tourism by fifty percent.
 
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racer1

Tom Curren status
Apr 16, 2014
12,982
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Honolulu, Hawaii
I agree that it is impossible to calculate down to the dollar, but how are the coming up with the average spend? Exit polls?
I did find some figures for May of 2021. The State figures give a total of 1.1 billion dollars spent by tourists that month. The total tourist count they give is 629,681 for that month. Just using the 4% GET tax (not figuring in the Hotel tax of 13.25% due to the fact they do not show how many stayed in hotels) that comes up to approximately 44000000. A pretty good contribution to the tax base of Hawaii.
Using the figure that tourism is only 20 percent of the economy of Hawaii, that leaves the remaining 80 percent. It would be nice to know what comprises this eighty percent. The good news is that with tourism contributing 1.1 billion dollars in May 2021, that means the remaining contributions by the eighty percent should have been massive, so no need to worry about our economy and we can afford to reduce tourism by fifty percent.
if I had to take some guesses: military (probably equal to tourism), real estate, construction, agriculture, mining, fishing,
 

youcantbeserious

Billy Hamilton status
Oct 29, 2020
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Here's a decent white paper that uses the industry level GDP model to break down Hawaii's economy in relation to the rest of the U.S. It does not mention tourism specifically, but the numbers can be inferred to an extent.

GDP report
 
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Waiehu

Legend (inyourownmind)
Apr 1, 2009
350
198
43
Here's a decent white paper that uses the industry level GDP model to break down Hawaii's economy in relation to the rest of the U.S. It does not mention tourism specifically, but the numbers can be inferred to an extent.

GDP report
Thank you for referencing this.
From the latest information I can find, the Military is the second largest sector of the economy in Hawaii. Figures given were 8.5 of the GDP and $7.7 billion. Less than half of Tourism (21%).
The latest I can reference for Agriculture has the industry coming in at 0.37% of the State GDP, or $336





 
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racer1

Tom Curren status
Apr 16, 2014
12,982
15,073
113
Honolulu, Hawaii
There is a lot of tourism money that goes untracked, but there's probably also a lot of tourism spending that leaves the island (big ticket purchases like car rental, hotel, airline etc like we discussed), so I'd say it probably balances out and tourism is 20-21% of the economy.

Imagine Hawaii if we reduced that by 1%, 2%, 3% or even 5%?? Sure, locals would have less income but maybe no traffic? Roads lasting longer? Emptier beaches? Emptier hikes? Less stress?

Paul Brewbaker, economist who used to work for Bank of Hawaii, wrote a report that tourism spending has been flat since the 80's. Meaning that more and more tourists have been arriving annually but each tourist is spending less and less. So the state has been pounded by record numbers of arrivals every year but the revenue hasn't increased in 30-40 years.
 

JSC

Nep status
Mar 11, 2008
675
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Paul Brewbaker, economist who used to work for Bank of Hawaii, wrote a report that tourism spending has been flat since the 80's. Meaning that more and more tourists have been arriving annually but each tourist is spending less and less. So the state has been pounded by record numbers of arrivals every year but the revenue hasn't increased in 30-40 years.
Places like Seychelles, Maldives and Mauritius have pursued the low volume, high revenue tourism model for years. Fewer visitors, but higher (much higher) spend per pax is less impact and less disruption for ordinary folks.

The only problem with this business model is there are far more middle and lower income potential customers than rich people and it is a system that reeks of segregation, exclusion and racism.

Maldives makes it very difficult for locals to participate in tourism by segregating visitors on their own islands and having very little contact between Maldivians and visitors - to the point where Maldivian muslims are excluded from many resort jobs to protect their religious sensitivities such as hiring Buddhist bartenders and breakfast cooks from Sri Lanka so Maldivians won''t have to touch alcohol or cook bacon and ham for rich European Christian folks.