Different strains....

santacruzin

Rabbitt Bartholomew status
Oct 17, 2007
7,758
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valley purgatory
Thanks, yeah, I figured as much. I got super paranoid when the whole plant was drenched from rain and ensuing heavy dew mornings. Definitely not ideal and could have gotten a better yield in hindsight BUT I have sampled the goods and the goods are good. Still drying and about to throw it into jars. No hybrid on this, chiiiiiill catatonic indica that creeps hard. Perfect to hit you right while you're paddling out.

I still have the Hindu Zkittles in the grow bag. Early-mid flowering and will restrain myself from harvesting until early November if possible. Weather forecast looks good, 50-80 for most part with no rain. Hopefully show my capacity to learn and get everything better on this one.
dude hold the line with the second one! everyone harvests the first plant they grow too early! next year!!
 

Kento

Duke status
Jan 11, 2002
65,141
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The Bar
dude hold the line with the second one! everyone harvests the first plant they grow too early! next year!!
I'm already looking forward to April. :roflmao:

Gonna get a better indoor grow light than the sh!t we improvised to get them started. Plants were both hurting due to early heat waves, once those quit and could bring them outside, we threw them into the grow bags with good soil and they blew up fast. Beautiful to see.
Now to debate which strains I should get. Decisions decisions... :unsure:
 
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SteveT

Miki Dora status
Apr 11, 2005
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Sorry Kento, I aint no pro, but this is what Santacruzin is talking about, too early.

I always try to wait as long as possible. But when the buds are dying faster than plumping, it's time to yank. Or if Fusarium Wilt makes an appearance, it's all over. Sigh, ask me how I know.
FARK!
I googled it.
That's what happened to my girls this year.
I was able to salvage only a couple of ounces:(
 

bruhdakine

Miki Dora status
Jul 7, 2003
4,779
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Thanks, yeah, I figured as much. I got super paranoid when the whole plant was drenched from rain and ensuing heavy dew mornings. Definitely not ideal and could have gotten a better yield in hindsight BUT I have sampled the goods and the goods are good. Still drying and about to throw it into jars. No hybrid on this, chiiiiiill catatonic indica that creeps hard. Perfect to hit you right while you're paddling out.

I still have the Hindu Zkittles in the grow bag. Early-mid flowering and will restrain myself from harvesting until early November if possible. Weather forecast looks good, 50-80 for most part with no rain. Hopefully show my capacity to learn and get everything better on this one.
Dude, it's a learning process. I am on year 4 and while my first two seasons were good, last year was when I finally dialed it in to where it meets or exceeds what I could just go buy at one of a million dispensaries (I rarely burn these days so it's more about the fun of growing these beautiful plants than anything else for me). Anyway:

1. Build yourself a little portable shelter / greenhouse. Some PVC pipe glued into a basic frame and some translucent plastic sheeting attached with packaging tape and zip ties will do the trick. You can build something movable that you can leave off most of the time but if you are expecting moisture or heavy dew, drag it over the top of them. If its about to be frosty, wrap the sides as well. It keeps your plants from getting too wet and also stung by frost. Just gotta pay attention to the weather report the way you would watch a surf or snow report.

2. Get yourself a little microscope. Stat getting to know what the trichomes look like. Snip a little sugar leaf off of one of your buds and look at them. When they are clear it is way too early. When they are cloudy it is close. When a few of them turn amber it is time to harvest. If they are mostly or all amber it is too late. Patience and timing is key. I have taught my wife and kids what to look for and I ask them for their input as well as I always get anxious to harvest. It's funny debating this with your teenagers but they are less attached to the plants so they keep me in check. Haha.

3. Don't over water. These plants like to be dry and hot. So flood them with water and nutes and then let them dry out so that the top of the soil is dry. In 15 gallon pots I typically flood each one with 3 gallons of water / nutes every 4-5 days. YMMV in a different climate. It's dry here in Bend.

Good luck on the next plant!
 

bruhdakine

Miki Dora status
Jul 7, 2003
4,779
341
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I'm already looking forward to April. :roflmao:

Gonna get a better indoor grow light than the sh!t we improvised to get them started. Plants were both hurting due to early heat waves, once those quit and could bring them outside, we threw them into the grow bags with good soil and they blew up fast. Beautiful to see.
Now to debate which strains I should get. Decisions decisions... :unsure:
It's a lot colder here than where you are and I just start them as seeds outside form the get go. They don't get as big as they could due to my yard and it's lack of sun for half the day (I wheel them around in wagons - lol) but they end up really nice by October. I'm not sure if starting them inside and then shocking them when you move them out is any more of an advantage over just starting outside in April (May here)? This year we had a super wet and cold May and I lagged on getting the seeds in the dirt but so they are smaller than last summer's crop but they are still loaded right now. Tight little plants full of flowers.

Also, maybe try 'up-potting'. The plants prefer a right sized pot. I start by popping the seed in a 1 gallon, move them to 3 gallon when they are as wide as the 1 gallon pot, and then finally to 15. It seems to help them grow strong and I'm using less water and nutes on the smaller pots (although they need to be watered more often).
 
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wedge2

Legend (inyourownmind)
Jan 20, 2011
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Got 3 weeks left on my outdoor and they are looking amazing...this hurricane is looking to sit on top of the mid-atlantic for a week soaking us with rain and humidity.

Not ideal - gonna ride it out and see if they make it through the slop...my indoor will hold me over for years
 
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Boneroni

Tom Curren status
Mar 5, 2012
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Goleta
This thread has turned pretty epic!

I have a black thumb and don't grow nothing, but I love reading about it and seeing all your pics :love:
 

Kento

Duke status
Jan 11, 2002
65,141
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Dude, it's a learning process. I am on year 4 and while my first two seasons were good, last year was when I finally dialed it in to where it meets or exceeds what I could just go buy at one of a million dispensaries (I rarely burn these days so it's more about the fun of growing these beautiful plants than anything else for me). Anyway:

1. Build yourself a little portable shelter / greenhouse. Some PVC pipe glued into a basic frame and some translucent plastic sheeting attached with packaging tape and zip ties will do the trick. You can build something movable that you can leave off most of the time but if you are expecting moisture or heavy dew, drag it over the top of them. If its about to be frosty, wrap the sides as well. It keeps your plants from getting too wet and also stung by frost. Just gotta pay attention to the weather report the way you would watch a surf or snow report.

2. Get yourself a little microscope. Stat getting to know what the trichomes look like. Snip a little sugar leaf off of one of your buds and look at them. When they are clear it is way too early. When they are cloudy it is close. When a few of them turn amber it is time to harvest. If they are mostly or all amber it is too late. Patience and timing is key. I have taught my wife and kids what to look for and I ask them for their input as well as I always get anxious to harvest. It's funny debating this with your teenagers but they are less attached to the plants so they keep me in check. Haha.

3. Don't over water. These plants like to be dry and hot. So flood them with water and nutes and then let them dry out so that the top of the soil is dry. In 15 gallon pots I typically flood each one with 3 gallons of water / nutes every 4-5 days. YMMV in a different climate. It's dry here in Bend.

Good luck on the next plant!
Awesome advice - thanks!

Previous owners left us some PVC piping, easy enough to cut that up and configure a cage with some plastic wrap around it. Good idea. I'm a pathetic geologist - no idea where my (or any) hand lens is, gotta get a new one. Yeah, when I harvested the first one, using a camera zoom, trichromes were mostly milky but none were brown. OK, lessons learned.

We have a drip irrigation system going so can generally regulate. I think the grow bags we have are 15 gallons, maybe 20.

In meantime, here is the other plant, definitely needs more time but is looking good so far.


1664489246539.jpeg
 

Driftcoast

Michael Peterson status
Aug 5, 2002
3,224
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I'm already looking forward to April. :roflmao:

Gonna get a better indoor grow light than the sh!t we improvised to get them started. Plants were both hurting due to early heat waves, once those quit and could bring them outside, we threw them into the grow bags with good soil and they blew up fast. Beautiful to see.
Now to debate which strains I should get. Decisions decisions... :unsure:
In February, just put a seed in a 1 gallon pot where it gets 8 hrs of sun a day outside, it will be fine in Santa Rosa, no need for indoor lights