Can i start a vegetable and herb garden thread?

rowjimmytour

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Anyone else this summer experience white mold on leafs :shrug: I cleaned off most of it but heard from my boss a spray of 10% rosemary oil w/ h20 stops mold and also works great on white flies. Also heard can score rosemary oil cheap at TJ's so I am going to check after work and well report back if it it works or not:shaka:
 
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r32

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Added a link to this thread in Popular Threads Index so it's easy to find.

'Gardening'

 
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Mr Doof

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Anyone else this summer experience white mold on leafs :shrug: I cleaned off most of it but heard from my boss a spray of 10% rosemary oil w/ h20 stops mold and also works great on white flies. Also heard can score rosemary oil cheap at TJ's so I am going to check after work and well report back if it it works or not:shaka:

Mildew by another name = white mold

Potassium bicarbonate (not potassium chloride!) is better. Get it from brewer supply store. Like a teaspoon to two gallons, might be wrong, look it up. Need to spray on leaves/affected parts.

Oils on leaves is generally no good as it will burn the leaves or clog their stomata.
 
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Aruka

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Potassium Bicarbonate like Doof says. I've used a brand called "Green Cure" that works pretty well and is AFAIK pretty benign and food safe.

Powdery Mildew is a fungus so other fungicides may be effective as well. Powdered sulfur is a cheap and readily available option but I probably wouldn't spray it on fruiting plants. Good as a spring preventative.

The white patches you see on the plant leaves is the fruiting body of the fungus. The fungus lives within the plant and it's pretty much too late to eradicate it by the time you see the white spots appear. There are systemic fungicides that would kill it but you don't want to use any of those on food crops at this point or ideally ever. You can hope to prevent the spread and keep it at bay long enough to get some food out of the deal though.

Generally powdery mildew is a sign of poor light, bad airflow, low calcium levels in soil or other environmental issues. Like most things prevention is key. Some plants are very susceptible though like cucumbers and squash so it's really an uphill battle even if you have everything dialed, especially if your climate doesn't cooperate.
 

PPK96754

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Its been a tough year for the garden. The endless spring rains thwarted my early plantings. If there was a market for slugs I'd be rich. Starting to get some consistent produce finally though.View attachment 135216
Those flowers, below the cucumbers ... one of the female sushi rollers at the restaurant garnishes her rolls with those same flowers because they're edible. Very nice to see that You grow them ~ :shaka:
 

Aruka

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Those flowers, below the cucumbers ... one of the female sushi rollers at the restaurant garnishes her rolls with those same flowers because they're edible. Very nice to see that You grow them ~ :shaka:
Yeah I'm a fan. They're Nasturtiums. My girlfriend planted them three years ago and they just keep coming back in the same spot. Super easy. They add a nice bite to salads, almost like a mild radish or something. I like the idea of having them with some sushi rolls- will have to try it:shaka:
 

SurfFuerteventura

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This place, keeps on giving.

:applause2::bowdown::applause2:

Jasmin, bougainvillea and hibiscus, also beautiful, scent full and edible. FTW!

Do those Nasturtiums grow well in arid places?

Gotta look into that... might try them myself too.

Edit: Nasturiums

Might try the Morrocan watercress variety. Thanks!

:waving::shaka:
 
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Senor Sopa

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Anyone else this summer experience white mold on leafs :shrug: I cleaned off most of it but heard from my boss a spray of 10% rosemary oil w/ h20 stops mold and also works great on white flies. Also heard can score rosemary oil cheap at TJ's so I am going to check after work and well report back if it it works or not:shaka:
Yes, ready to give up on tomatos

Made a batch of pesto
1659621008622.png

1659621039641.png
 
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Northern_Shores

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Potassium Bicarbonate like Doof says. I've used a brand called "Green Cure" that works pretty well and is AFAIK pretty benign and food safe.

Powdery Mildew is a fungus so other fungicides may be effective as well. Powdered sulfur is a cheap and readily available option but I probably wouldn't spray it on fruiting plants. Good as a spring preventative.

The white patches you see on the plant leaves is the fruiting body of the fungus. The fungus lives within the plant and it's pretty much too late to eradicate it by the time you see the white spots appear. There are systemic fungicides that would kill it but you don't want to use any of those on food crops at this point or ideally ever. You can hope to prevent the spread and keep it at bay long enough to get some food out of the deal though.

Generally powdery mildew is a sign of poor light, bad airflow, low calcium levels in soil or other environmental issues. Like most things prevention is key. Some plants are very susceptible though like cucumbers and squash so it's really an uphill battle even if you have everything dialed, especially if your climate doesn't cooperate.
I get white growth on my bonsai trees. I spray with green soap mixed in water. Also kills the lice on the leaves.
 

rowjimmytour

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Potassium Bicarbonate like Doof says. I've used a brand called "Green Cure" that works pretty well and is AFAIK pretty benign and food safe.

Powdery Mildew is a fungus so other fungicides may be effective as well. Powdered sulfur is a cheap and readily available option but I probably wouldn't spray it on fruiting plants. Good as a spring preventative.

The white patches you see on the plant leaves is the fruiting body of the fungus. The fungus lives within the plant and it's pretty much too late to eradicate it by the time you see the white spots appear. There are systemic fungicides that would kill it but you don't want to use any of those on food crops at this point or ideally ever. You can hope to prevent the spread and keep it at bay long enough to get some food out of the deal though.

Generally powdery mildew is a sign of poor light, bad airflow, low calcium levels in soil or other environmental issues. Like most things prevention is key. Some plants are very susceptible though like cucumbers and squash so it's really an uphill battle even if you have everything dialed, especially if your climate doesn't cooperate.
After I tried to clean the mold off each chile plant best I could I made a stand for my chile garden with 2x4s stacked so pots 7" off ground and plenty of air flow. Seems to be helping but still have not got a spray yet but like you said if it shows up thick its to late. Still plants seem to still produce chiles and read hurts leafs when it goes dry so lately we still have over 90% humidity during the night to early morning.
 
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sussle

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Yes, ready to give up on tomatos

Made a batch of pesto
View attachment 135243

View attachment 135244
looks good. have figured out that i prefer pesto slightly toned down coz straight basil is really strong. these days, we whack the pesto with baby spinach, 50/50, and it's really good. have a neighbor who makes pesto with other herbs like cilantro instead of basil, which sounds pretty interesting.
 
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sussle

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ok, this slightly weird and somewhat cute: someone keeps leaving flats of starter vegetables next to my garden - third time this week i have come outside in the morning to find flats of tomatoes, lavender, cilantro, basil, swiss chard etc next to my raised beds. my neighborhood is about 50% second homes coz it's the beach....most of the nabes don't garden, they landscape (which we all know is not the same thing)....so i'm figuring it's someone who bought the stuff but never got it into the ground (and it's getting kind of late in the season for most of it). might as well be a box of puppies or kittens coz now i'm compelled to plant this stuff and salvage what i can. not a bad problem to have but really odd.

IMG_20220805_124931619_BURST000_COVER.jpg
 

Aruka

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looks good. have figured out that i prefer pesto slightly toned down coz straight basil is really strong. these days, we whack the pesto with baby spinach, 50/50, and it's really good. have a neighbor who makes pesto with other herbs like cilantro instead of basil, which sounds pretty interesting.
Ive done cilantro pesto and its totally good. Pesto actually freezes pretty well so i like to do big batches in the food processor and freeze the excess in little pint jars. You can sub other nuts for the pine nuts which are expensive. Walnuts have never done me wrong.

I didnt grow basil or cilantro this year which I am regretting.
 
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sussle

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Ive done cilantro pesto and its totally good. Pesto actually freezes pretty well so i like to do big batches in the food processor and freeze the excess in little pint jars. You can sub other nuts for the pine nuts which are expensive. Walnuts have never done me wrong.

I didnt grow basil or cilantro this year which I am regretting.
straight cilantro? straight basil is just too intense for me but cilantro is somewhat milder. i love the whole idea, although cilantro tends to bolt about 20 minutes after i plant it every year so i never have a lot of it on hand. rosemary might be interesting - you'd probably have to cut it way down with spinach or another green coz it's strong...but i could imagine a scoop of rosemary pesto on top of a baked potato :shaka:
 
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Mr Doof

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Cilantro pesto, parsley pesto, basil pesto....all great, and yes, understand that 'pesto' is not perfect to use for at least two of these, but so what?

When I make these, I tend to keep it as simple as possible: olive oil, little salt and pepper, the greens. Other stuff I add as the situation calls (for maximum versatility)..though I do make most of the basil pesto with oil, garlic, handful of walnuts, salt and pepper, and some red pepper flakes (because it is good to not have to work too hard at times).
 
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littlewave

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You can sub other nuts for the pine nuts which are expensive.
I sub out pine nuts, but not because of the cost:


:barf:

Love pesto but don't eat it unless I make it or it's made without pine nuts.

Walnuts have never done me wrong.
My go to is pistachios, but walnuts are great too.
 
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