Best strength training routine? Thoughts?

freeride76

Michael Peterson status
Dec 31, 2009
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Lennox Head.
Not sure what is “pissant and ghetto, as per usual” about my question.

I was serious.

I can remember weightlifting was a PITA for all of us groms in high school because all the muscle fatigue was affecting our surfing negatively.

A lot of the guys in this thread don’t surf all that much so the gym rat life is a viable option.

I think adding weights into competing in beachbreak 2 or 3 hours a day 3 or 4 times a week …. In addition to cardio ( running) 12 miles a week…. I think my muscles would be fucked. Not to mention I already eat like sh!t to keep up with all the calories I burn.

So I thought it would be interesting to know what your gym routine is because you actually surf a lot.

im guessing it’s all point surf though so maybe not comparable? not sure if you walk back or paddle back there but you’re probably paddling less anyway cause being on the high end of the pecking order you’re not having to compete.

btw, be careful with the dips - have several friends who are competitive swimmers and both say they are a “no” - risky for rotator cuffs.
No, not your question, my program. The question was taken in good faith.

I paddle sh!t loads.

almost always a heavy paddle out and quite often a constant paddle to stay in position.

The program I mentioned above produces zero muscle soreness......that's why I reckon VM would laugh at it, because it's so lightweight.

I don't do any set-apart cardio apart from the paddling I do every week, an an occasional conditioning session. If there is no surf.
 
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freeride76

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Dec 31, 2009
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Lennox Head.
My training philosophy is strategic, long term ambiguity.

Do something every day for a long time.
Pay attention and do more of what works.

Adjust accordingly.

Try something new once in a while and incorporate or reject.

If I was in So Cal I'd cash out VM and get a proper coach.
 

VonMeister

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No, not your question, my program. The question was taken in good faith.

I paddle sh!t loads.

almost always a heavy paddle out and quite often a constant paddle to stay in position.

The program I mentioned above produces zero muscle soreness......that's why I reckon VM would laugh at it, because it's so lightweight.

I don't do any set-apart cardio apart from the paddling I do every week, an an occasional conditioning session. If there is no surf.
My training philosophy is strategic, long term ambiguity.

Do something every day for a long time.
Pay attention and do more of what works.

Adjust accordingly.

Try something new once in a while and incorporate or reject.

If I was in So Cal I'd cash out VM and get a proper coach.
I readily admit my training has gotten in the way of other things I enjoy...like surfing. I do firmly believe I will be surfing longer now than if I didn't begin training. My training also isn't for everyone. Resistance training is as important as any other aspect of healthcare yet probably the most overlooked health metric. I have switched gears a bit and have dialed the intensity way back and taken a longer view of my training rather than trying to force strength gains and I'm much better for it as I have more time to do other things instead of being fatigued and recovering.

Anything is better than nothing.

There's a saying, "treat the doughnut, not the hole". if you read these forums or just talk to people in life it's always the same....this hurts, how do I fix it. The answer is you can't, especially as we age. Degeneration is a part of life no matter if it's caused by specific trauma, repetitive motion, or age related. Muscle protects and replaces the functions of other soft tissues. It's both the prevention and the cure. Work on the doughnut, don't wait for the hole to manifest.
 
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Sharky

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I've got a squat rack, bench setup and 400 some pounds of Olympic weight that is going mostly unused now.

Kettlebells do really positive things for my surfing, martial arts (striking), and frankly the way I look with my shirt off at my age. All the picky little pains vanished. The strength seems highly functional for what I want to do and I'm only lifting around 106 pounds max at this point. Most of it is done with 35 to 53 pound KBs. Very few rest breaks, over in maybe 45 minutes, cardio+ all in one. I can lay off surfing for some time and come back with very little in the way of a penalty with my current routine.

In the past, before going to the gym was normal for surfers, (early 80's) I had a hideous injury and crawled into a gym in constant pain (and against Doctors advice) at about 185 pounds. Years later I was 210 with single digit body fat. I had my life back. In spite of what my doctors were telling me. But training heavy eventually got in the way of my surfing. Especially as I got older. I got drawn into this thing where it was kind of a phobia of getting weaker. I did damage. Whatever. Do what works for you, do what helps you attain what you want to attain. IMO, what works for you at any given point may not work as well down the road. Be creative about it and take the long view. I hit harder now at 195 than I did much younger at 210. Some of that is just improvement in technique over time. But whatever. Before this COVID thing I was sparring with guys that less than half my age. As time goes on, you are going to have to do something to keep doing what you love. Figure it out.
 
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PRCD

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There's something about kettlebells that simply looks less scary and is believed to be more beneficial than barbells or dumbbells. I think it's that they're just rounder and look less threatening. From there, the nervous system concludes less threatening = greater benefits from moving with a less threatening object than doing nothing.

Edit: the kettlebell looks like a toy and the barbell and dumbell look like tools. Toys are associated with fun and tools are associated with work. Work is often not fun and can be painful. Why not train with a toy rather than a tool? This fits the biopsychosocial model of pain.
 
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Sharky

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There's something about kettlebells that simply looks less scary and is believed to be more beneficial than barbells or dumbbells. I think it's that they're just rounder and look less threatening. From there, the nervous system concludes less threatening = greater benefits from moving with a less threatening object than doing nothing.

Edit: the kettlebell looks like a toy and the barbell and dumbell look like tools. Toys are associated with fun and tools are associated with work. Work is often not fun and can be painful. Why not train with a toy rather than a tool? This fits the biopsychosocial model of pain.
I'm not going to argue with you. I guarantee you I have more time in with Olympic weights/lifts in than you can even dream of at this point. I would have probably made the same argument you are during certain decades. As time marches on and you keep going, keep this conversation in mind. Or don't. Makes no difference to me.
 
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Ifallalot

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Such good info from VM on this thread

GromsDad, if you want to get started the easy way, spend $25 on the Mark Rippentoe Starting Strength app. You get the book for that too
 

freeride76

Michael Peterson status
Dec 31, 2009
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Lennox Head.
There's something about kettlebells that simply looks less scary and is believed to be more beneficial than barbells or dumbbells. I think it's that they're just rounder and look less threatening. From there, the nervous system concludes less threatening = greater benefits from moving with a less threatening object than doing nothing.

Edit: the kettlebell looks like a toy and the barbell and dumbell look like tools. Toys are associated with fun and tools are associated with work. Work is often not fun and can be painful. Why not train with a toy rather than a tool? This fits the biopsychosocial model of pain.
Reasonable hypothesis, but not true here.

it's just an easy, convenient way to lift something heavy and train wherever I am.

I can throw a 50lb kb in the back of the car and do a little workout while my son is at the skatepark or playing footy or wherever.
 

grapedrink

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I've got a squat rack, bench setup and 400 some pounds of Olympic weight that is going mostly unused now.

Kettlebells do really positive things for my surfing, martial arts (striking), and frankly the way I look with my shirt off at my age. All the picky little pains vanished. The strength seems highly functional for what I want to do and I'm only lifting around 106 pounds max at this point. Most of it is done with 35 to 53 pound KBs. Very few rest breaks, over in maybe 45 minutes, cardio+ all in one. I can lay off surfing for some time and come back with very little in the way of a penalty with my current routine.

In the past, before going to the gym was normal for surfers, (early 80's) I had a hideous injury and crawled into a gym in constant pain (and against Doctors advice) at about 185 pounds. Years later I was 210 with single digit body fat. I had my life back. In spite of what my doctors were telling me. But training heavy eventually got in the way of my surfing. Especially as I got older. I got drawn into this thing where it was kind of a phobia of getting weaker. I did damage. Whatever. Do what works for you, do what helps you attain what you want to attain. IMO, what works for you at any given point may not work as well down the road. Be creative about it and take the long view. I hit harder now at 195 than I did much younger at 210. Some of that is just improvement in technique over time. But whatever. Before this COVID thing I was sparring with guys that less than half my age. As time goes on, you are going to have to do something to keep doing what you love. Figure it out.
Good post. Most people overdo it and there's a point of diminishing returns where you are getting more ego gains than health gains. There is a recent study that muscle mass and strength can be maintained with 1/9 the effort required to get there. I could get behind that sort of routine :roflmao:
 
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PRCD

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Reasonable hypothesis, but not true here.

it's just an easy, convenient way to lift something heavy and train wherever I am.

I can throw a 50lb kb in the back of the car and do a little workout while my son is at the skatepark or playing footy or wherever.
You know what's even more convenient than a kettlebell? Bodyweight. You can use it to lift something heavy and train wherever you are. You can throw your body into the care and do a little workout while your son is at the skatepark or playing footy wherever.

There is something about the novelty of the kettlebell that gets people to want to "work out."
 

grapedrink

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You know what's even more convenient than a kettlebell? Bodyweight. You can use it to lift something heavy and train wherever you are. You can throw your body into the care and do a little workout while your son is at the skatepark or playing footy wherever.

There is something about the novelty of the kettlebell that gets people to want to "work out."
What I like with kettlebells is that the center of gravity is offset, which could help recruit different muscle fibers. I like them for accessory work.
 

Sharky

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Feb 25, 2006
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I’ve done periods of body weight/calisthenics. My problem was that in order to get the results I wanted I had to invest huge blocks of time to get anywhere.

That and I seriously hate burpees.

I have seen people achieve remarkable results however.
 
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VonMeister

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If someone came into my gym and said, "I only like kettlebells" I would find a way to make it work...then figure out a way to sneak in some barbell training and watch their life change. With Sharky though...you're not talking about some beta who grunts when lifting their latte. He's going to be fine.
 

VonMeister

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I’ve done periods of body weight/calisthenics. My problem was that in order to get the results I wanted I had to invest huge blocks of time to get anywhere.

That and I seriously hate burpees.

I have seen people achieve remarkable results however.
No one in their right mind likes burpees.

The time investment continuum. Years of trial and error will never bring you to an absolute. All you can do is set reasonable goals and reasonable expectation of progress if your lucky land in the ballpark. Once in the ballpark tinker as a last resort and keep your goals in reach. Is your training optimized??..who knows because you can only measure what you're actually doing...I just focus on measurable progress using historical training data. It sounds like you're already doing that but if you ever want to #lift4likes let me know and we'll have you deadlifting 500 pound by your 60th birthday (unless that's next year :roflmao:).
 
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Autoprax

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You don't want to lift weights, we get it.

You don't need to lift to the point of being sore AF all the time. That's a 90s myth that is starting to die off but still persists. I've had plenty of stretches of my life where I surfed and lifted on consecutive days with no issues.
I used to lift body builder style where you smoke the muscle. Then you try to surf the next day and it's impossible.

I think you just maintain lifts.

You dead lift once a week.

Maintain the ability to do a set of 20 reps of pull ups.

Bench ones a week doing one work set.

Do some hang cleans.

Work on being able to do t-spine extensions for paddling.

That will help rather than hurt.

And what works for one doesn't work for the other.

I do my best working out in the gym 45 mins 6 days a week.

I become like a beautiful flower in bloom.

Or at least I used to.

https://soundcloud.com/user698828797%2F01-old
 
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Sharky

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No one in their right mind likes burpees.

The time investment continuum. Years of trial and error will never bring you to an absolute. All you can do is set reasonable goals and reasonable expectation of progress if your lucky land in the ballpark. Once in the ballpark tinker as a last resort and keep your goals in reach. Is your training optimized??..who knows because you can only measure what you're actually doing...I just focus on measurable progress using historical training data. It sounds like you're already doing that but if you ever want to #lift4likes let me know and we'll have you deadlifting 500 pound by your 60th birthday (unless that's next year :roflmao:).
60 was a few years back for me. I'm about 60 on my current avatar and that was a few years back. The thought of 500 pounds on the bar gives me the vapors. I'm going to need a few reps with my latte! :beer:

Thanks.
 
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