“Buy a house at the beach!” They said. “Build equity! Score a ton of surf!”

Random Guy

Duke status
Jan 16, 2002
27,699
1,256
113
From the internet: homeowners insurance technically covers damage for tropical hurricane winds and rain. However, depending on where you live, a special hurricane or wind deductible may apply
 

Subway

Rabbitt Bartholomew status
Dec 31, 2008
7,704
1,445
113
LBNY
sh!t, the policy says i have a $9200 deductible for "catastrophic windstorm" so maybe i DO want it to be categorized as a hurricane?
 

Subway

Rabbitt Bartholomew status
Dec 31, 2008
7,704
1,445
113
LBNY
fukk. it may not even matter either way

Update- spoke to insurance rep. yeah, hurricane or not, i have a $9200 windstorm deductible. This could have happened ANY OTHER FUKKING YEAR AND I WOLD NOT HAVE BLINKED, BUT NO, IT JUST HAS TO HAPPEN IN THE WORST FINANCIAL YEAR OF MY ADULT LIFE
 
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Random Guy

Duke status
Jan 16, 2002
27,699
1,256
113
sh!t, the policy says i have a $9200 deductible for "catastrophic windstorm" so maybe i DO want it to be categorized as a hurricane?
In that case, i don’t think it makes a difference whether it’s hurricane or not. Unless there’s something specific about hurri canes in the policy
 

hackeysaky

Miki Dora status
Dec 19, 2002
4,352
23
38
NJ
Most policies have an additional hurricane deductible. For what it's worth, people were bitching that the "superstorm" designation (which was technically correct as it was a hybridized system at landfall) was used to describe Sandy at landfall vs. classifying it as a hurricane without understanding it worked in their favor.

Some companies wisened up as a result of/since Sandy and broadened their definition to include other high-wind events in their parameters to apply the deductible. But generally, the less an event can be fit into a category, the better for the policy holder.
 

Sharkbiscuit

Tom Curren status
Aug 6, 2003
12,925
3,994
113
Jacksonville Beach
Dang I didn't really follow it but it looks like this thing really clapped NC and NY.

It was a rumor in most of Florida. Fort Lauderdale wore like three days of feeder bands, and nobody else saw sh!t.

In fact if I have one complaint, it's that on Monday, the wind went side-off/off in the morning, then around 1:30, right when the tide was starting to get good, and the surf was legit starting to fire everywhere, a feeder band came through, the wind went side-on, and by the evening, instead of the forecast offshore, we had a normal day sea breeze.

Glad we got three days of fun surf and no damage, but kind of pissed I was walking up the beach upcurrent, watching it clean up and tide drop and about to start completely choobing hither and tither, and it got wind-wrecked by by basically the strongest feeder band the Jacksonville area got.

Storm was just kind of a dick.
 

everysurfer

Phil Edwards status
Sep 9, 2013
6,736
1,805
113
Santa Barbara County
sh!t, the policy says i have a $9200 deductible for "catastrophic windstorm" so maybe i DO want it to be categorized as a hurricane?
It could be much worse. City real estate prices are down 17%

 

mundus

Duke status
Feb 26, 2018
15,654
3,242
113
Dang I didn't really follow it but it looks like this thing really clapped NC and NY.

It was a rumor in most of Florida. Fort Lauderdale wore like three days of feeder bands, and nobody else saw sh!t.

In fact if I have one complaint, it's that on Monday, the wind went side-off/off in the morning, then around 1:30, right when the tide was starting to get good, and the surf was legit starting to fire everywhere, a feeder band came through, the wind went side-on, and by the evening, instead of the forecast offshore, we had a normal day sea breeze.

Glad we got three days of fun surf and no damage, but kind of pissed I was walking up the beach upcurrent, watching it clean up and tide drop and about to start completely choobing hither and tither, and it got wind-wrecked by by basically the strongest feeder band the Jacksonville area got.

Storm was just kind of a dick.
Dont feel bad Nj only got a couple of good hours out of it, fastest dropping swell ever!
 
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Sharkbiscuit

Tom Curren status
Aug 6, 2003
12,925
3,994
113
Jacksonville Beach
Dont feel bad Nj only got a couple of good hours out of it, fastest dropping swell ever!
Okay but the storm was going Mach-4 like always by the time it hit New Jersey, and a ton of the fetch was blocked by Hatteras until it was on top of you. Not the case here. Did the wind go onshore after already turning offshore and forecast to go more offshore, like 99% of hurricanes?

Because I've never seen what happened here on Monday. Never, and it takes something special for North Florida to really fire. It can get "good", but "good" here normally means longboarders can make it out. Good everywhere else means they get asswhooped, viciously, trying to duck dive.

We really, really, really need the storm to be right on top of us to have any punch out the back. Otherwise, it walls out, softens up, etc. Only when there's a storm right off Georgia do we really get any grunt on the outside sandbar.

To add insult to injury, Monday evening, at mid-tide, the inside sand ledge was showing all the promise in the world, and when the tide got up onto it, for whatever reason, it was hitting dogshit sandy foam and shutting down. You'd see a guaranteed corner pocket tuberide mound and wedge over the flooding outside, paddle to the hook, turn to look, and it turned into a waist high closeout with another waist high closeout on top of it. Where not 15 seconds prior, there was a stomach high side piece and a chest-head high wave screaming dry square one.
 

mundus

Duke status
Feb 26, 2018
15,654
3,242
113
Okay but the storm was going Mach-4 like always by the time it hit New Jersey, and a ton of the fetch was blocked by Hatteras until it was on top of you. Not the case here. Did the wind go onshore after already turning offshore and forecast to go more offshore, like 99% of hurricanes?

Because I've never seen what happened here on Monday. Never, and it takes something special for North Florida to really fire. It can get "good", but "good" here normally means longboarders can make it out. Good everywhere else means they get asswhooped, viciously, trying to duck dive.

We really, really, really need the storm to be right on top of us to have any punch out the back. Otherwise, it walls out, softens up, etc. Only when there's a storm right off Georgia do we really get any grunt on the outside sandbar.

To add insult to injury, Monday evening, at mid-tide, the inside sand ledge was showing all the promise in the world, and when the tide got up onto it, for whatever reason, it was hitting dogshit sandy foam and shutting down. You'd see a guaranteed corner pocket tuberide mound and wedge over the flooding outside, paddle to the hook, turn to look, and it turned into a waist high closeout with another waist high closeout on top of it. Where not 15 seconds prior, there was a stomach high side piece and a chest-head high wave screaming dry square one.
Ok, I feel your pain!
 

PJ

Nep status
Jan 27, 2002
600
81
28
Shrub Oak,N.Y.,USA
Sorry about your roof subway. PPK dropping some knowlwedge on how to temporarily dry in the place.

If you do get insurance money, consider replacing roof with something stronger- preferbly hip style roof with metal.

No one does this in the states, but the way we build in the Caribbean is the roof rafters are thick 3x material and are cast into the bond beam with straps or vertical u-shaped rebar tied into the wall rebar grid. Then the choice is either plywood with elastomeric coating or metal, each have their own merits. Nobody uses shingles here because they are terrible for strong winds.
We do have something relatively new in our building codes in NY - Hurricane Clips - They go where the roof rafters at the bottom of the roof rest on the top of the side wall of the house. They are like a squared off U - you slide the clip up so the rafter sits in it then screw or nail it to the rafter and the top of the side wall (like 6 screws or so). This is to prevent the entire roof from lifting off. Not as beefy as what you're doing in the Caribbean though.
 

Sharkbiscuit

Tom Curren status
Aug 6, 2003
12,925
3,994
113
Jacksonville Beach
Earthquakes and fires in CA or hurricanes in NY?
I don't really understand Hurricanes in NY. They move fast that far North, and they're normally under 100.

We tend to sleep through Cat-1s here. Don't even really bother. 90, you hope you don't get particularly unlucky with a tree, but it's like a 1 in 40 to 1 in 100 thing.

New York, it looks like any storm or Cat-1 claps the crap out of the place, and it's not like you had 150 years for trees to get complacent. You got Gloria in the 80s, Bob in 91, some others, Sandy...

Yet every time some half assed storm hits, it looks like downed tree central, nobody has power, forever...
 

Subway

Rabbitt Bartholomew status
Dec 31, 2008
7,704
1,445
113
LBNY
i was the only house on my block that actually got damaged, other than Cathy's awning across the street, that got shredded to pieces. The rest of the northeast- the park-like suburban sprawl means lots of big old hardwood trees that fall on homes and power lines etc
 
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Driftcoast

Michael Peterson status
Aug 5, 2002
3,124
282
83
To add insult to injury, Monday evening, at mid-tide, the inside sand ledge was showing all the promise in the world, and when the tide got up onto it, for whatever reason, it was hitting dogshit sandy foam and shutting down. You'd see a guaranteed corner pocket tuberide mound and wedge over the flooding outside, paddle to the hook, turn to look, and it turned into a waist high closeout with another waist high closeout on top of it. Where not 15 seconds prior, there was a stomach high side piece and a chest-head high wave screaming dry square one.
Sounds like good Stinson Beach to me
 

PJ

Nep status
Jan 27, 2002
600
81
28
Shrub Oak,N.Y.,USA
We use 40kg tanks for cooking gas, and would probably get a stationary tank, so no problem there. What generator were you using? Other than the gas being shut off how did it work out for you?

One thing about living here, we never go without heat. :drowning:
It was gas heat no genset. It was an interesting experience no heat hot water till December, had electric, lot of sh!t work to be done. Surf was completely uncrowded and best sandbars ever. Edit. meant natural gas not propane.
For Hurricane Sandy here in NY North of the city I had no power for about a week - after the first day I found Propanecarbs.com and for $175 got a kit to convert my gasoline 5,300 watt Briggs and Stratton Storm Responder generator to natural gas or propane. Gasoline, propane and natural gas engines are all constructed the same and are relatively cheap compared to a diesel engine which is expensive to build. The conversion is so simple, you slide the air cleaner off of the front of the carburetor, screw on lengtheners for the two threaded studs then slide the new gas ring up against the carburetor then the air cleaner back on. You also have to mount about a 6" diameter gas regulator onto the generator (If you only have a plug in electric drill make sure to drill the holes before you shut your power off and take the generator apart :socrazy: - I strapped a wood board onto the generator temporarily and hand screwed into the wood).

I had a natural gas connection for a BBQ so I connected to that. It's 3,412 BTU's per KW so 5,300 watts is 18,083 BTU's - about 1/2 of a 3 burner grill. That gets me 20 amps of 220v or two 120v 20 amp circuits however you want to slice it. My boiler is like 80,000 BTU's and I can run that and a say 36,000 BTU BBQ at the same time so there's plenty of capacity in my service.

So to run on natural gas instead of gasoline you shut off the gasoline petcock while its running, run it out of gasoline, get it running on natural gas then adjust the fuel mixture screw on the regulator until the RPM is the highest - smoothest. Then I went a little rich just to drop the RPM a bit and know that I'm on the rich side - lean can hole a piston. For propane you would just adjust the mixture again. There's no timing change, no spark plug change - no nothing to do really, its so simple. Even though natural gas does, I think, burn cleaner than gasoline there are other chemical byproducts of natural gas combustion which also contaminate the motor oil so the oil change interval of 50 hours stays the same. So there it is - Tri -Fuel for $175. They sell them that way new also. Last year I ran on generator 24 hours a day for 6 or 7 days and my natural gas bill that month was only $60 higher - amazingly cheap compared to gasoline.

So if you have natural gas or propane Tri-Fuel is a great choice. For a remote place with a permanent mounted in place generator I think that Propane is the best choice because there are no fuel aging, water in the fuel, fuel jelling in the cold (diesel fuel) problems. And, although fuel stabilizer for gasoline is nice - dead dry I think is nicer - 5 years during which I didn't need mine at all went by fast.
 
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TangTonic

Legend (inyourownmind)
Feb 24, 2011
550
202
43
Honestly Subway, looking at the pics, it seems very easy to get up there with some tar paper or peal and stick membrane and then reshingle for probably less than 2K. Maybe you don't want to, but seems like a pretty straightforward repair to me.
 
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