Originally Posted By: StuAzole
Originally Posted By: Duffy
Originally Posted By: StuAzole
Originally Posted By: Surfdog
Wouldn't bother me one bit if my drivers license (new or old) ID'd me as a legal citizen, or not.


Great but that’s still hypothetical. It also leaves out people who don’t drive.

But back to today. Explain to me how it should all work today, starting with my prior questions regarding how local jurisdictions begin to establish legality in the first place.


My son got a state ID when he was 12 so he can use his credit card (we send him to the grocery store sometimes).

It’s not a driver license. It’s a state ID, just like a driver license except fo the driver part.

And if someone in custody doesn’t have verifiable citizenship status then the police should call ICE.

But in CA calling ICE is prohibited.

It’s also illegal for me, as an employer, to tip off ICE if I suspect one of my employees to be an illegal alien.

Let me say that again...

It’s also illegal for me, as an employer, to tip off ICE if I suspect one of my employees to be an illegal alien.

And the state AG “will prosecute” me if I do that.


The employer thing is a different issue. We’re addressing how cops would hold people for citizenship matters.

My kids don’t have an ID that declares citizenship other than a passport. They don’t know where we keep the passports. Today, what ID is there that all legal residents would have that would suffice here?

But let’s go with it. A person is picked up for lifting a 6-pack of Budweiser. As it turns out, he wasn’t the guy who stole the beer so thy start to let him go. In the process though, a cop asks if he’s legal. He says yes. Cop demands proof. Guy says he doesn’t have it on him. Does that trigger a call to ICE? Do they hold him indefinitely? Is he charged with a crime? Bail or no?

Walk me through it.


The cops let him go then he robs your house.


"That's their respect for me... I got leid," Rabbit Kekai

"That's all it takes--one moment." Sponge